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Please Help

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by los3r, Jan 1, 2002.


  1. los3r

    los3r Guest

    Jan 1, 2002
    USA, Kentucky
    I just started playing bass so far I love it. I jsut have a couple questions..If anyone would be kidn enough to answer i would love it....

    1.) I cant seem to get down were exactly to place my left hand thumb.

    2.)Tuning not quite sure how..:confused:

    3.) Would you recommend learning easy tabs first like Nirvana such and such,, or harder stuff?.

    ..
     
  2. First of all, welcome to TB. Glad to have another low ender.:)

    As for your questions, here's my take:

    1) Keep your thumb on the back of the neck. This will give you more mobility with your fretting hand and better technique. Learn this now while you're starting out. I let myself wrap my thumb around the top of the neck when I started and am having hell trying to break the habit now.

    2) If you can't get your hands on a tuner, find somewhere to get a reference note and go from there. There's a free chromatic tuner you can download at playpro.com, or I'm sure you can find websites to give you an A tone to tune your A string to. After that, fret the E string at the 5th fret and tune it to match the A string. Do this for all of the strings (5th fret of the lower sounding string should be the same as the next higher string played open).

    3) I'd suggest going for something harder, like learning notation. Standard Notation has a lot more information to offer than any tab can convey. If all you're interested in is learning to play a few songs, then by all means, tab away. There's nothing wrong with that. But if you want to develop all the musical tools you can, work on the notation. Finding a good teacher will help you with your playing no matter which way you go.

    Anyway, have fun (that's what this whole thing is all about anyway, isn't it?) and good luck.
     
  3. learn what ever music interests you, and more, the cool thing about the bass is that no matter what type of music you like, you can fall in love with a bass riff from any type of music, and knowing other stuff can help you when you start writting or producing you own stuff. start off easy get the hang of it, but don't limit yourself. Also get a teacher, they can help you a lot. My last piece of adivce, practice! everyday twice on sundays, make it fun though, don't make it like work! any other question, you came to the right place! good luck!
     
  4. 1- keep left hand thumb in center of neck, positioned between first and second fingers. try and keep from 'planting' the thumb. don't squeeze too hard and let your thumb move up and down the neck.

    2- Get an elec. tuner!

    3- Learn the basics of standard notation. then you can do anything you wish...

    Bonus - buy a teacher! Money well spent!

    Good luck.
    K.
     
  5. los3r

    los3r Guest

    Jan 1, 2002
    USA, Kentucky
    Thanx for all the help i appreciate it.
     
  6. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
     
  7. "
    Words more true have never been spoken ...
     
  8. los3r

    los3r Guest

    Jan 1, 2002
    USA, Kentucky
    .Thanx alot you all, now instead of learning the tabs to a song and not really knowing how to play it, Iam half way through my note studys book and im learning triplets and 16th note studys..
     
  9. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    There is theory behind Nivana songs? :p
     
  10. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Actually I think that starting off by playing arpeggios ,scales and burying your head in theory is a pretty bad idea for beginners. Sure, learning the major scale and perhaps learning how a 12-bar blues works is good for starters but definately play easy tunes that you like as well, otherwise you'll probably get bored quickly. You can use tab in the beginning as well , but as you develop lean more towards learning tunes by ear, and then learning standard notation if you've got the motivation and time.

    /lovebown
     
  11. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    lol...theres gotta be some right?



    Your one of the few people Ive ever heard say that learning scales, arpeggios, and theory is a bad idea. Other than it being boring, how is it bad?

    I think it's ok to learn cover's that intrest you in the beginning, just as long as you suplement some of your practice time with theory/site reading lessons. The theory teaches you all you need to know about music. How is he going to know what he's playing if he just learns to play tunes? (ex: he learns a cover tune in G, hows he gonna know anything more than he's just playing 3rd fret E string, or 5th fret D string?)

    Learning scales and arpeggios will also teach him proper fingering placement for when he frets the notes on the covers he's trying to learn. The tabs will only tell him where to put his fingers.

    At the beginning phase is the most crucial time imo and many others opinion's to learn theory/technique. Thats when your most impressionable and apt to pick up bad habbits.
     
  12. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden

    I think you misunderstood me man, I'm not saying learning theory is a bad idea, it's definately a good idea, but I mean, what's the point of learning all the letters in the alphabet if you're not going to write anything?

    What I'm trying to say is progress slowly from the beginngin and cover the major scale and learning which fret is what note and such. I think for a complete beginner learning major/minor arpeggios in all keys and all the modes for instance is too advanced and should be saved until later.
    Too much theory without practice will just confuse the student anyway.

    Also - theory can in fact go in hand with the songs you are learning! Most good teachers I've had have taken ideas and licks from the song and explained them in a more theoretical way, this is a great way of learning and also understanding songs.

    /lovebown
     
  13. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    I think you're both trying to say something similar, from different angles.

    But -

    How can you write anything without knowing the alphabet, and moreover how to turn letters into words, words into ideas?
     
  14. los3r

    los3r Guest

    Jan 1, 2002
    USA, Kentucky
    I agree with pacman
     
  15. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Oh C'mon you understand what I'm trying to say right? I know of people who can play stuff they don't understand in theory, I guess that means they can write words but don't know the alphabet...whatever.. ;) ..in any case I think that learning bass is abit like learning a language... you have to learn to talk for sure (play) but it doesen't hurt to be able to write (understand theory).

    Ehh ..ok I'm not gonne use these damn metaphoric crap in the future it just messes things up hehe

    later,
    /lovebown