Poll: Leo Fender's best design?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by steamboat, Jun 10, 2001.

What is Leo Fender's best bass design?

Poll closed Nov 27, 2003.
  1. Fender Precision

    65 vote(s)
  2. Fender Jazz

    107 vote(s)
  3. Musicman Stingray

    80 vote(s)
  4. G&L L Series

    49 vote(s)
  5. Other Fender (specify)

    6 vote(s)
  6. Other Musicman (specify)

    8 vote(s)
  7. Other G&L (specify)

    3 vote(s)
  1. I'm posting this for no other reason than to get some friendly discussion going over what people feel that Leo's best design is. The "other" options for each company are there because I can think of a lot of other basses made by each of these companies, but I'm not sure which ones were actually designed by Leo.
  2. Oh yea, if you go with one of the other options, remember that there are a lot of basses made by Fender, Musicman, and G&L that Leo did not design.
  3. dude, theres also two versions of the precision, original "tele" which was called a precisision, and then the one we currently know as a precision
  4. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    ...including the Jazz bass.

    Leo Fender did not plan to create the Jazz bass. it was a marketing move. Once the Precision bass proved that there was a market for the new instrument (which it was at the time), They set out to create a prettier, more expensive model. That's how it came about.

    I vote on the Stratocaster.

  5. Brendan


    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    I'd have to say, of all the basses, he did it with the Jazz bass. The sheer versatility that that bass posses makes it a definte hall of famer. I think that the Jazz bass is one of the best, I mean, thousands of people like the tone, and it's hard to get people to agree on that sort of thing. So Jazz it is...

    So what if it was a marketing move?
  6. NJXT


    Jan 9, 2001
    Lyon, FRANCE
    Even if I voted MusicMan because my mind was completely bass oriented, I must agree with Big "Hypnotise me !" Wheel, the Strat is the most beautyfull piece of art by Leo Fender, IMO.
  7. Nino Valenti

    Nino Valenti Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 2, 2001
    Staten Island NYC
    Builder: Valenti Basses
    Before Leo sold Music MAn to Ernie Ball, he made the Sabre for a few years (Enine Ball produced it for a few yrs after). That bass seems to be the testing grounds for what has later become the G&L L-2000, which happens to be my favorite non-custom shop, master luthier built bass on the market. So to me, it seems with out the Sabre, there would be no L-2000. :)
  8. this is personal opinion here and I do not intend to be the catalyst poster for a feud, but when asking for the opinions of TBers regarding the 'best design'
    I think you'll see that the winner will be the bass that has been available for the longest amount of time. In this case I will say that the precision or the jazz will be favorite.

    it stands to reason that people identify with the bass they like the best, not because it is technically the best design, but because they are more familiar with that design.

    if everyone were to have an accurate objective opinion they would have to have tried every bass on that list and then categorically listed what features they liked about the bass and how they had rested upon their final decision.

    it may be that they like the Stingray, not because it is the most aesthetically desirable bass or ergonomically efficient, but because it's the bass that they liked.

    therefore this post, to be fair to Leo Fender, is not to find out what his best design was, and is, but what his most 'popular bass design is.

    it has been stated in posts previous to this that a bass is chosen because " it is my favorite" or "in my opinion"

    and to finish, I voted for the Jazz, because it is the only bass of Leo's that I played and liked, but I felt I had to make this post to justify my vote.
  9. Very clever idea, Nino.
    I'll vote the L-2000 too.

    IMO We couldn't vote the Jazz for the above written reasons.
  10. no way dude, the tele is where it's at. mojo for miles.
  11. Let's see. Leo invented the Tele guitar first. Then came the Precision (Tele shaped) bass. He tried to kill off the Tele guitar with the Strat, but didn't succeed. He created a better selling, more versatile guitar, but didn't kill the Tele. He changed the body on the Precision to look like a Strat and it sold even better so the Tele shaped Precision was dropped and not missed by most. (Rumor has it that it will appear again in the Fender line-up at the Summer NAMM show). He created the Jazz bass to cater to a more upscale market and probably figured that it would eventually replace the Precision, just as the Strat was to replace the Tele. The Tele still lives and sells quite well. The Precision still lives, in it's second major configuration, and sells very well. The jazz sells well also, and many Jazz owners also own Precisions, or is that Precision owners who also own Jazzes, or??????

    Aw Crap!! You cannot even begin to say what is better. As was stated above, the results of this is a popularity pole, not a better pole. And better is so damned subjective that it is abolutely impossible to determine "better".

    For the music that I play, and have played for most of my playing career, over 40 years, the P-Bass is the hands down winner. I keep trying the Jazz bass, thinking maybe I either didn't give it a fair chance the last time, or I just didn't understand it, or I ate some bad fish at the time I owned it, or???????? But the end result is that I use it for a short time and go back to my P-Bass(s). The only contender that I have found to really give my P-Basses a run for their money, is the RB-5, and Leo didn't have anything to do with it.

    OK! Popularity! I vote for the P-Bass. It has anchored more music than anyone can possibly imagine. And it's still a perinial favorite. The Jazz Bass is popular also, so what does either fact prove?

    However, I suspect that a higher percentage own both than own a solo Jazz or solo P. Also, most owners of Jazz basses, from the ones that I know, and the posts that I see here and elsewhere, seem to own multiple Jazzes. The owners that I know, seem to use the P just as much as the multiple Js combined. In the solo category, I know a number that own a solo P, but most Jazz only owners seem to own more than one Jazz. You figure out what all this means.

    Naw! Precision is where it's at for this old bassist. Of course, this is my OPINION, and cannot be construed is gospel, anymore than any of the other OPINIONS that have been stated here. It's also like arguing about the weather, or blonds vs redheads vs brunettes, or politics, or any other subject. It's subjective.

    I thank my fellow TalkBassers for a nice controversial no-win subject once again. While they are fun, they never seem to go anywhere. Which is probably a good thing. With that, I close.
  12. Since these are just opinions, I vote for the Jazz.
    It's both visually appealing, and that sound! Oh!
    I've always liked its asymetrical body as opposed to the Precision.(although I love P basses too) The sound of a Jazz is, IMHO,timeless.

    If Leo were Edgar Allen Poe, the Jazz bass would be his "Raven."

    If Leo's creations were women, then the Jazz would be Catherine Zeta-Jones.(too much for the heart)

    Mike J.
  13. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Body design??? - Anything with the famous "Fender contour". You guys who have owned/played one know what I'm talking about.

    Electronics??? - The Jazz. because of the trick he pulled with getting rid of the single coil hum.
  14. Oh man, I have to pick just one? I guess that's the case, so I voted for the Precision, because I like the thumpy sound it has, but that's just because I like it better, not because it is better. I really like the Jazz Bass too, only a few weeks (I hope!) until I get a MIM Jazz.
  15. jasonbraatz


    Oct 18, 2000
    Oakland, CA
    IMO it's a tie between the stingray and the jazz bass.

    very distinctive, kick ass basses even if they're not made out of a strange african wood or have 20 pieces of wood laminated together.

  16. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    Are you sure you wanna get into that discussion? Dude, I love the Tele. Andy Summers is one of my favorite guitarists and I'd play a Tele if guitar were my main instrument, but The mere fact that Hendrix played a Strat outmojos the Tele by leaps and bounds.

    Ironically, I'm not into Hendrix's music at all.:oops:
  17. Mike J: If the Jazz is Catherine Zeta Jones, then the Precision is Sophia Loren! Older, sweeter, sexier, and by all means the greater beauty.

    Big Wheel: Be confident in your love of the Tele. Many of the great Studio musicians play a Tele. And most of those guys can play circles around the majority of the "Stars". In MHO, and many others, the Tele is the greatest solid body electric guitar ever conceived. Mojo is where you find it. Just look and you'll find a lot of Tele Mojo. Just look!
  18. Harpo


    Feb 1, 2001
    Kings Park NY
    Just Think of all the Great Bass and Guitars that Leo Fender has Given Us I want one of each !
  19. Screw the competition...I've got a Strat, Jazz and Precision and love em all :D :D :D

    Seriously, if I had to pick one bass as his best design, then I'd have to go with the ingenius simplicity of the Precision. An incredibly simple and solid design which dominates the planet of bass, even now with all these other option out there.

    I love all of my Fenders, but I think the Precision is Fender's best, and most important, design.
  20. JimM


    Jan 13, 2000
    Northern California
    The Jazz is,in my o,prettier,easier to play,and perhaps more musically useful in some situations.

    However,the familiar tone of the Precision is an icon of all roots music-Rock,Blues,soul,Gospel,Funk etc.
    the way that split pickup "sees" just one place on the strings while killing hum is simply marvelous.Really gives it that coveted punch.I know it's not the original design,I still like it.I also suspect the width of the pickup somehow gives it a richer sound than a soloed J p/up.

    I played a Jazz for 20 years,now I,too have Both,and a Strat.