Poor Jamal Lewis

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Peter McFerrin, Dec 29, 2003.

  1. So close, and yet so far.

    On that note, if his appearance during the ESPN broadcast of the Ravens-Steelers game is any indication, I think Eric Dickerson may be trying to assert his status as Los Angeles' reigning Smug Bastard in Chief. I'll show him... :smug: :smug: :smug:
  2. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    as a Steelers fan, something for me to cheer about.....the last thing I wanted to see was highlights of Jamal Lewis breaking off the final run to set the record, and seeing Steeler players falling all over themselves to tackle him for the rest of my life.

    Lewis had eight carries for five yards in the fourth quarter!! Hip Hip Hooray!!

  3. Ty McNeely

    Ty McNeely

    Mar 27, 2000


    Eric Dickerson is *THE* smug bastard. period.

    I'm happy to see him not get it. In my opinion, he DOES NOT deserve it. C'mon--500 yards against one team? Thats not greatness, thats an awesome O-Line against the league's worst run defense.
  4. RAVENS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11!!
  5. cassanova


    Sep 4, 2000
    Or just pure luck.
  6. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
    All those yards against the Browns came in, what, 7 quarters? No doubt, had Lewis played that 4th quarter a couple weeks ago...he would have the record.

    IMO, it's moot anyway.
    As alluded above, the NFL is watered-down.
    Jim Brown woulda run for 3,000 yards against this sorta competition.
  7. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
    Did your finger spasm?
  8. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    And that would've just been in the season opener;)
  9. Yeah, Jim Brown was great. I respect everything he's done, including his role in The Dirty Dozen :D . The fact remains, however, that Jim Brown was so dominant in his day because he was bigger than most defensive linemen of his time. Nutrition, from birth to draft day (and beyond), has caught up with him.

    If a modern-day Jim Brown could be re-created weighing 350 pounds and running a 4.2 in the 40, then we might be talking about something. As it stands, though, his dominance stemmed entirely from his then-extraordinary physicality.
  10. Yogi Bear

    Yogi Bear Supporting Member

    Aug 14, 2000
    Which is why someone like JB was such a stud. Imagine what he could have done with 300lb lineman to run behind.

    The same can be said for Earl Campbell.
  11. Earl Campbell's career was cut short 'cuz he didn't dodge tackles the way a Barry Sanders or Emmitt Smith can. I can see Ricky Williams being out of the league after 7-8 years, the way Campbell was.

    I don't think Brown would have been all that much better with a bigger line to run behind. Remember, bigger blockers also mean bigger tacklers.

    It's interesting, though, that so many backs are running for 1500+ yards these days, when offensive line cohesion is at its lowest ebb due to the ravages of free agency. It may be a consequence of the trend toward safety-sized linebackers; this, combined with the immobile 3/4-ton defensive lines that seem to be de rigueur in the NFL these days, allows backs to break into the secondary with a lot more ease than they would have 10 years ago.
  12. Yogi Bear

    Yogi Bear Supporting Member

    Aug 14, 2000
    Yeah I see what you're saying...

    It's tough to compare players like James Brown when looking at the guys playing these days. So much has changed , and is changing.

    The trend these days seems to be to ride your star player until he's hurt, ala Earl Campbell and even Terell Davis from the Broncos. Davis was on his way to a stellar career, but got beat-up from being run way too much.
  13. Well, you can have a ton of carries, like Sanders or Smith, and still be productive for many years; it's all about your running style. Terrell Davis and Ricky Williams tend(ed) to lower their shoulders and plow through tacklers instead of trying to dodge them. That's gonna be hard on your body.
  14. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
    I agree. Free agency is giving the fans a substandard product(great for the players & their agents...bad for us & the sport).
    Football is the ultimate team sport.
    Basketball has become "street ball" or Slam Ball minus the trampolines. ;)
    Hockey? I've seen guys play like a team after about a week of practice.
    Baseball? Puh-leez!

    Anyway, I agree the offensive line requires a few seasons to develope as a working unit.
  15. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
  16. I don't think steroids are actually as big a deal in football as they are in sports like baseball and track, because they only offer very minor improvements in muscular strength. THG isn't going to get you from benching 250 to 400 on its own.

    A slight boost in muscle strength can add ten feet to a baseball player's power stroke (which usually translates into homers), or shave 0.1 seconds off of a sprinter's time in the 100 (which usually translates into victory). In football, though, the subtleties aren't quite as important due to the fact that you're talking about a game in which 350-pound men are tackling you.
  17. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
  18. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Interesting thoughts about steroid use in the NFL Peter. It is definitely not as noticeable in the NFL since the guys are big anyway, and covered in pads.

    Think about this though. Shaving .1, or .2 off a guys 40 time can mean a few million and draft position. Adding a few more reps on the 300 pound bench press can improve his draft prospects. Being able to perform like an animal in practice day in and day out can make the difference in starter, and bench player. Steroid use in the NFL is more about increasing performance, than size. Guys looking for an edge. I realize that the NFL has publicly denounced the show "Playmakers" on ESPN, but I think it gave a good view of how guys approach steroid use in the NFL. I played competitive football into college, and seen it quite often.

    In baseball, it is too obvious. Take a guy like Bonds. Go check out a few pics of him from just a few years ago. Juiceman Senior!

  19. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
    Or Bret Boone.
    I had this sorta conversation elsewhere about baseball & working out. The season is so damn long...when do these guys hit the gym? I'm assuming it's not during the season, so when?
    The offseason is, what, about 3-4 months?
    That doesn't seem like a lotta time to increase the mass we're seeing in some of these guys...especially some of the 'older' star-types.
    Just one man's opinion...