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Posted this in Luthiers' section, but was hoping for quick response.

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Basschair, Mar 21, 2005.


  1. Basschair

    Basschair .............. Staff Member Supporting Member

    Feb 5, 2004
    Stockton, Ca
    Hello folks,

    So the luthiers must have actual jobs, unlike me who can just sit around on my behind ;)

    So, like any good forum user, instead of posting I searched first and got what I needed: advice on how to clean and oil my Warwick's wenge fingerboard. I went with the Scotch Brite scrubbing pad and lemon mineral oil, and the fingerboard & frets look new...ahhhhh, it feels like the first time, no?

    So, along with upright and electric bass, I dabble in classical guitar. I have two from the same manufacturer, both with rosewood fingerboards. The frets on one have some tarnish build up, and I'm wondering if I can use the same approach to clean: completely unstring, scrub down with the grain, lemon mineral oil, wipe down, oil again, let sit, wipe again, restring, and smile? Thanks for your help guys!

    Paul
     
  2. Juneau

    Juneau

    Jul 15, 2004
    Dallas, TX.
    Yeah, it should work the same on rosewood as on wenge :)
     
  3. Jmaginnis

    Jmaginnis

    Mar 15, 2005
    Don't wanna highjack here but I have been wondering about this for my geddy as well. Is there anything that I shouldn't use because of the finish? Or would a scrubbing pad and lemon mineral oil do just fine?
     
  4. Juneau

    Juneau

    Jul 15, 2004
    Dallas, TX.
    Is your geddy epoxied? If so, lemon oil will likely only make it slipery lol.
     
  5. Jmaginnis

    Jmaginnis

    Mar 15, 2005
    Yea it is.

    So what cleaning agent should I use on it then? My frets badly need a cleaning.
     
  6. Juneau

    Juneau

    Jul 15, 2004
    Dallas, TX.
    Well I hate to tell you something that might damage anything, but I would think with an epoxied board, you could use just about any type of cleanser, like windex even (allthough not my first choice hehe). You would want to make sure to get it all off though as it could discolor or rust out frets. Probably your best bet would be to get guitar cleaner from a local music shop.

    Again, this is just my thoughts, I do not know what the proper cleaning method for an epoxied board would be. Oil wouldnt soak in is the only reason I say that likely wouldnt work for you, but then again, I have been wrong before hehe.

    Its also possible you could use something like a 0000 steel wool and VERY lightly clean the board with that. You would want to do this upside down (neck pointing at the ground) and outside and make sure to clear off any shavings so they dont get into the mag p'ups. Then you could use a minwax or something to buff the shine back into it. (Kiwi Natural Shoe Polish works as well) PLEASE PLEASE wait for a qualified answer before attempting that though. Id hate for my advice to ruin a finish on your fingerboard hehe. I do this to the neck of my bass to clean it, but its possible the epoxy would not react so well.
     
  7. Jmaginnis

    Jmaginnis

    Mar 15, 2005
    Yea it's cool I'm heading down to the guitar store tomorrow. I'll ask the guy there. Thanks for the help though.
     
  8. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    If your frets are getting corroded, here is a good way to clean them: Use masking tape, and cover the fingerboard in between the frets. Use more than one layer. Then use some fine steel wool to clean off the gunk. You could use a wind instrument polishing cloth to polish up the frets without removing any material. A silver cloth for flutes works very well.
     
  9. Jmaginnis

    Jmaginnis

    Mar 15, 2005
    I was actually contemplting taping over the fretboard and taking some steel wool to it, but I am gonna see what the dude at the store tells me first.
     
  10. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Well, unless he's a tech, he might not know. I used to do it for a living, and I still do some odd jobs. What you could do is use painters masking tape, and use a shirt or something to partially de-tack it. This will keep it from pulling up any weak spots in the finish. Then, when you remove it, just peel the tape back along the same line that it lays.
     
  11. Hi

    The lemon oil I keep hearing about - is this like essential oils that you would use in aromatherapy or something different?