Pots pots pots !

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Microbass, Jan 6, 2004.

  1. I have a few questions.

    So last week, jamming, and i hit the bass off of a table, by accident. This broke off the tone knob! D'oh!

    being that my bass is somewhat vintage, I'd like to try and keep everything original as it is currently... is it possible to change the Pot-shafts? I don't think it is, but it's worth a shot, eh?

    so if this somewhat of an impossible job... I just need to pickup a pot of the same make/resistance? does the make of pot actually matter? so if i buy one pot of a diff. manufacturer, i'll need to replace the other, correct?

    and last , but not least, is it possible to have more passive controls? i.e. a passive bass/treble (stacked) pot? If so, what would be the difficulties?

    thanks all, i didnt find anything in my searches, so lets hope these Q's havent been done to death! thanks! :cool:
  2. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    Anything is possible, but replacing the shaft of an existing pot is not something worth considering really.

    Just get a pot from your local shop. Assuming you get a replacement of the same specs, the proper installation will make more difference than the actual pot. There is no need to replace the other pot.

    Yes, it is possible to use a concentric pot to create seperate bass and treble. Although, the value would be limited. Passive controls are cut only. They do not boost given frequency levels.

    In other words, your passive tone knob doesn't add treble but rather cuts it as you turn down the knob.

    If you think there is use in being able to cut both the treble and the bass and keep nothing but a big ball of midrange, it is doable. You'll need a stacked pot to start. Then just do some research on the proper value of capacitor to use to get the bass and treble to cut where you want them to.

  3. It's a pretty well known fact amongst Fender owners that a noticable difference can be made by replacing the cheaper pots in Fender Japanese basses with higher quality pots. Actual resistance CAN be much different from the advertised rating and that's where you can see some gains.