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Powering 9v EBS pedals with 12v

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by brandonwong, Aug 30, 2007.


  1. brandonwong

    brandonwong

    Dec 16, 2003
    Is there any harm in supplying 12v to 9v pedals?

    I have a couple of EBS pedals and my 9v adapter always induce a hum in them. A 12v computer device supply i have powers them up nicely and the LED also lit up brighter than 9v supply.

    I send this 12v to a Visual Sound Volume pedal and Fishman Platinum pro EQ and it doesn't seem to have any problem. Is this okay for the long run?
     
  2. Lebowsky

    Lebowsky Effects Forum Resident

    Mar 18, 2007
    Lausanne, Switzerland
    I think that if there was to be a problem, they should have fried instantly... you could ask EBS about it.. but I bet they'll tell you "you should only use the EBS psu"
     
  3. brandonwong

    brandonwong

    Dec 16, 2003
    Yes.. i used them for 7 hrs straight today without any problems. I read that some pedals might even perform better at a higher voltage, giving more headroom.

    Interestingly enough... my powerex 9.6v 230mah rechargeable gives out 11.8 volts at full charge.
     
  4. EBS will also tell you that using more than 9.6V voids warranty, just as it says in the manual(s).

    The 9V adapter causes hum because it has poor filtering, is being used beyond it's designed limits, or because it is faulty. Get yourself a good quality regulated supply and the hum will go away. Oh, and it's obvious, but worth mentioning that just because the LED is brighter doesn't really mean anything in terms of sound quality enhancements.

    I cannot speak for every pedal, but one of the EBS pedals I own has 16V and higher rated capacitors, so 12V should be ok. But, the reason they use higher voltage ratings than needed is because it improves long-term reliability. So, reducing that "safety margin" would also reduce capacitor reliability from stock.
     
  5. jzucker

    jzucker

    Feb 3, 2005
    Cleveland, OH
    ebs pedals fry if you look at them funny. They don't even like non ebs power supplies with the same rated spec and they are extremely sensitive to power supply hum. I wouldn't use them with anything but their power supplies.
     
  6. JanusZarate

    JanusZarate Low End Avenger Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 21, 2006
    San Francisco, CA, USA
    :eyebrow:

    I've had the exact opposite experience. My MultiComp has never given me issues, and I've never used it with an EBS power supply.

    Anyhow... back to the OP. I'd highly recommend NOT trying that 12VDC adapter out with every pedal you own. You'll likely fry a few whose parts won't tolerate 12V!

    Unless a pedal is known to work well at a higher voltage, I wouldn't take chances. If it does work, the benefits are typically marginal anyway.
     
  7. jzucker

    jzucker

    Feb 3, 2005
    Cleveland, OH
    After reading the rave reviews around here, I bought their compressor, chorus and octave box. Aside from them all being extremely mediocre, every one of them had problems. The compressor was DOA and I sent it back to MF. I've never had a problem with any of the boss, digitech, fulltone, DLS, TC or other pedals I've got. I run on a highly regulated and filtered power supply too. It actually goes through 2 stages of filtration and transformer stabilization.
     
  8. brandonwong

    brandonwong

    Dec 16, 2003
    Hmmm... i will go find myself a 9v supply. It's funny tho that my rechargeables put out 11 volts at full charge.
     
  9. That's not uncommon, you'll find that 11V very quickly disappears when the batteries are under load.
     
  10. NorCal Dog

    NorCal Dog

    Nov 28, 2005
    415/707
    ya,,, my multi-comp just recently fried :crying:
     
  11. brandonwong

    brandonwong

    Dec 16, 2003
    Oh dear.. how did u fry it?
     
  12. brandonwong

    brandonwong

    Dec 16, 2003
    Got a external harddisk type switching power supply 9v, 2A today... for $12 :)
    I just have to change to a 2.1mm head.

    My pedals are totally quiet now, and i can probably run 20 pedals with that supply.

    Hooray!
     
  13. 343 Salty Beans

    343 Salty Beans

    Jan 24, 2006
    Part of hum comes from loading too many high-amperage pedals...more than your PSU can handle. However, I run several of my 9v pedals at 12v (although not buffered pedals, it makes hum worse), with no issues. The 12v improves the headroom of my blender (which has always had problems with distortion), DIY delay, and Ashdown Compressor.
     
  14. jzucker

    jzucker

    Feb 3, 2005
    Cleveland, OH
    very few pedals are high amperage. Maybe some of the tube based pedals. What do you use that's high amperage?
     
  15. 343 Salty Beans

    343 Salty Beans

    Jan 24, 2006
    digital stuff (dl4, dd20, loopers...)
     
  16. RickenBoogie

    RickenBoogie

    Jul 22, 2007
    Dallas, TX
    On the EBS conversation, I just got an EBS Valve Drive preamp/od, that makes alot of noise. Aside from the unwanted noise, it does have a sweet warm overdrive, and alot of range, but the noise is killing me. It's 12 volts AC, and I'm running it off a Furman, so where's this noise coming from? Cheapness? (it was $300) Sometimes you just can't win.
     
  17. What's the noise like when you unplug the input?
     
  18. EricJ

    EricJ

    Feb 28, 2008
    I couldn't get my EBS multicomp to work with a 9v Radio Shack adaptor I had in the garage. Turns out it was putting out 14.2 volts. I've ordered a stablilized 9v from a more reputable business.
     
  19. JanusZarate

    JanusZarate Low End Avenger Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 21, 2006
    San Francisco, CA, USA
    Eric: voltage isn't everything. It needs to be a regulated 9V supply. Unregulated supplies are not pedal friendly, and Radio Shack happens to sell both types.
     

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