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Powering bass cabinets

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Jmiah, Jul 31, 2020.


  1. Jmiah

    Jmiah

    Jul 14, 2020
    Hey guys,

    Im in between jobs right now and im on a tight budget. I've got great sounding Carvin BX750 that I know how to carve a great sound with my bass but I'm shopping for a cabinet. Zzounds has 2 options that I'm looking at: one is for a 200 watts 2x10 and the other is a 500 watt 2x10. Both are 8 ohm. The 200 watt cabinet is more in my price range. My amp will run 8 ohms at 300 watts. As long as I run at a fairly moderate volume, which I tend to do anyway, will I be ok or do I run the risk of blowing speakers regardless?
     
  2. Paulabass

    Paulabass

    Sep 18, 2017
    Same question is running right now over in the dead horse aisle. Use common sense and your ears.
     
  3. BogeyBass

    BogeyBass

    Sep 14, 2010
    LOL

    @Paulabass


    But yeah..for the OP. speaker is, what a speake is. I'll take wattage ratings with a grain of salt. But gut feelings and price points sometimes tell a story.

    Thing is classic cabinets like EdenXLT and others like GK or classic Ampegs. Float around for amazing used prices these days. The higher end to mid-range level cabinets that required a healthy budget in the day. Sell for prices unheard of now. Anyhoo food for thought . Heck even 210HE or SVT15E are decent mid level cabinets. Pop up often
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020
  4. Without more information it's not actually possible to be sure the ''500''w cab would even handle more power either. Ears for the win.
     
  5. Jmiah

    Jmiah

    Jul 14, 2020
     
  6. Jmiah

    Jmiah

    Jul 14, 2020
    Ok great thank you Paula
     
  7. Killing Floor

    Killing Floor Supporting Member

    Feb 7, 2020
    Austin, TX
    If you start with the amp level very low and raise until your speakers start to sound close to their limit, that's as loud as you should go.
     
    5aP and Jmiah like this.
  8. Jmiah

    Jmiah

    Jul 14, 2020
    Awesome ok cool. Thanks for the tip killing floor.
     
  9. If they start to sound quieter it's time to stop. This can happen if you cut lows and boost output level too far for thermal comfort.
     
    agedhorse likes this.
  10. Eddie LeBlanc

    Eddie LeBlanc

    Oct 26, 2014
    Beaumont, Texas
    None
    To purchase any speaker cab.... you need to compare two things immediately, when they are similar and the same impedance (ohms)

    Sensitivity and Frequency response.

    Sensitivity equals the ability to be louder usually listed in Db per watt - Cabs that are 102 dbs will be perceptibly louder than those rated at 98 dbs
    (rule of thumb = a 3 db increase is a perceptible change in volume, a 10 db increase is approximating doubling the volume)

    Frequency response is the ability of the cab to produce the notes you play along with upper harmonics
    produced by the note. The ear at birth can hear 20 hz to approximately 20,000 hz.

    B String E String A String D String G String C String
    Open
    B - 30.8hz E - 41.2hz A - 55.0hz D - 73.2hz G - 98.0hz C - 130.8hz
    But resonating harmonics can go easily to 4,000 hz. but percussive info can exist above that.

    Look at this chart
    BassFreqRange.png
     
    5aP likes this.
  11. agedhorse

    agedhorse Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 12, 2006
    Davis, CA (USA)
    Development Engineer-Mesa, Product Support-Genz Benz
    Also, be sure that your specs for comparison purposes are based on the same measurement metrics.

    For example Watts (peak) are not the same as Watts (RMS).

    Same for sensitivity, if the spec uses 1/4-space rather than 1/2-space, even if (or especially if) it's not stated, the numbers will be higher for an identical speaker.

    Same for frequency response. How many dB down the stated spec uses as its benchmark will affect the published frequency response numbers for an identical speaker.
     
  12. We get some version of this question all the time:

    'D'Ya think I can get by with a 100-watt cabinet hooked up to my ****** 1500 watt amp and get away with it? How bad will dancers in front of the stage be injured by flying bits of random speaker parts and grill ?'

    For me, it's a no-brainer, because I know me: IF I were still gigging (or even one of those LOUD days around the house), I'd just keep turning it up, and various mechanical and electronic anomalies would occur shortly.

    SO, buy the one with FAR LESS chance of burning, blowing, or explosively demolishing it. Or buy the small one and a chain mail blanket to put over it . . . .
     
    Blueinred likes this.
  13. abarson

    abarson

    Nov 6, 2003
    Santa Cruz
    You will get more cab with less money if you shop used.
     

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