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Practical Mode Patterns

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Nickweissmusic, Apr 25, 2017.


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  1. Nickweissmusic

    Nickweissmusic Knows all intervals from one Fred, to Juan octave Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2014
    San Diego, CA
    I teach lessons and perform live music in and around San Diego CA. Sometimes I even make money doing it!
    These are the patterns that Scott Mason taught me at Roosevelt University, not sure if he devised them, but if you like organized patterns, these should be right up your alley.

    I chose A as the starting point because I could fit all the patterns on the fretboard, obviously you're encouraged to move them around. Some patterns work better low on the neck, some high, etc.

    My left hand fingerings are in between the staves. I highly recommend learning them to create consistency between the patterns and avoid leaps between the 3rd and 4th finger.

    Hope this helps ;)


    Bass Ionian and Dorian.


    Bass Phrygian and Lydian.


    Bass Mixolydian and Aeolean.


    Bass Locrian.
     
  2. tom_305

    tom_305 Supporting Member

    Jul 25, 2015
    Nick those patterns are very helpful. Thank you.
     
    Nickweissmusic likes this.
  3. StatesideRambler

    StatesideRambler

    Jul 1, 2015
    Nick,
    Are you familiar with the Segovia Scales? Your etude and its notation rather resembles that. Segovia Scales depict fingers and strings much like you do, are written in all keys in order, in major and relative minor, cover two and three octaves on guitar and they also come back down the scale, mostly with varied fingerings. Right hand patterns are there as well. The scales and fingerings aren't arbitrary but are based on the classical guitar music repertoire. That's been quite useful in helping my mental flexibility.

    Allowing that they're written for guitar, I've adapted them to my practice on four-string bass. Unfortunately I don't have my variant notated but Segovia Scales can usually be found online, though they are hard to find being still under copyright. Check 'em out.
     
    Nickweissmusic likes this.
  4. Nickweissmusic

    Nickweissmusic Knows all intervals from one Fred, to Juan octave Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2014
    San Diego, CA
    I teach lessons and perform live music in and around San Diego CA. Sometimes I even make money doing it!
    Cool, I'll check that out, I'm a guitar player too so couldn't hurt, I hear Segovia was ok at music.

    On another thread someone suggested playing modes with 4 notes per string, as far up or down the fretboard as you can go. Now that's a crazy simple way to mix things up and cover a lot of ground, that never occurred to me in 20 years of teaching. I think my next little project might be putting some "standardized fingerings" to that concept. I assume there are only three fingerings needed for major but I haven't played through it yet.

    I like to standardize fingerings because if you practice a particular arrangement of notes on a string the same way, you build consistency, and eventually, confidence that you can trust your fingers to go to the right place. People complain about that being too rigid, all I can do is sigh and say, ok, don't do it then. I don't see it as rigid, I see it as simplification. On stage or in the studio, I'd rather have my hands react, than negotiate.
     
    Groove Doctor likes this.
  5. Great resource Nick!!

    Agreed. It's only a problem if you only ever play it one way. Playing scales multiple ways breaks those ruts and frees you to automatically play a note as you think it. Exactly the same skill set as touch typing.

    It helps me with sight singing too. I practiced singing the notes of every scale & every chord as I practiced them on guitar and piano years ago. Now I can pitch the notes by doing the scale/chord fingerings in my mind, even jazz chords. Ultra handy skill I gotta say.

    4 notes per string I've come across that too. Also, playing a scale: on only one string, on two adjacent strings, on two non adjacent strings (from a guitar lesson on how to still play with a broken string).
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2017
    Nickweissmusic likes this.
  6. I warm up with arpeggios of the modes (Cmaj7, Dm7, etc). I mix ascending & descending ( C' = C octave) using various finger formations.
    eg. CEGB C'AFD EGBD' E'C'AF etc.

    I learned to play open voicings of arpeggios (R-5-10, or R-7-10-12) from left hand of piano music. Lots of ideas for tastefully playing double- & triple-stop chords there.

    I do a warmup R-5-8-9-10-9-8-5 thru the modes of a scale.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2017
    Nickweissmusic likes this.
  7. Nickweissmusic

    Nickweissmusic Knows all intervals from one Fred, to Juan octave Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2014
    San Diego, CA
    I teach lessons and perform live music in and around San Diego CA. Sometimes I even make money doing it!
    Can you share a sample tab of how you'd do that? Can't wrap my head around it :)
     
    Groove Doctor likes this.
  8. CDCDEDCG
    35579755 Fret
    ADGGGGGD String
    13124211 Finger
    (1st Finger holds G D & A strings, raking across 5th fret to start on D of next pattern).

    Then similar....
    DADEFED EBEFGFEB FCFGAGFC GBGABAGB AEABCBAE BFBCDCBF CDCDEDCG

    60bpm playing quavers. Actually I add a semiquaver trill (technically a mordent, underlined below) to spice it up.
    C D C D E DED C G


    Uses all 4 fretting fingers & Combines stretches, shifts, rakes, trills, & arps of modes from 3rd fret A string to 21st fret of G string (high E).
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
  9. Great video here of arpeggios @Nickweissmusic
    (not me, it's on guitar, but great resource).
     
    Nickweissmusic likes this.

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