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practice amp

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by kserg, Jun 10, 2004.


  1. kserg

    kserg

    Feb 20, 2004
    London, UK
    ok well i need a suggestions
    need practice amp... found one

    Peavey Minx 110 bass practice amp (30w, 1x10").

    The problem: blowing fuses on a regular basis. Have not used for a few years since then. Other than the power issue it was previously working well. Very good condition.

    any idea if that’s fixable and how bad is the problem:/ its 40$... i was thinking of dropping it to 30 and trying to fix it:/ think its worth it? or keep looking? whats the worse i am looking here fix wise? i thought maybe get it and try fixing it myself:p

    Thoughts comments spell-check free sex all welcomed!

    Thanks... Cheers
     
  2. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    If an amp continually blows fuses (and they are the proper fuses to begin with), that's a sign that something's wrong inside. Something is either failed or out of adjustment and is therefore drawing more current than it should.
     
  3. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    The Minx is pretty simple inside. If you're skilled in repair it should be easy, if not, please keep your hands out so that you don't kill yourself. Being only 30 watts, the real hazards are on the line side before the transformer but it's not worth risking your life.

    I'd say it would be cheaper to fix/have it fixed now before the power transformer burns out. You're probably still looking at a repair bill that is more than the amp is worth if you aren't capable of fixing it yourself.

    For the grief, you can find a perfect working one for a $hundred-ish.

    Good luck!
     
  4. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    That's actually the amp you've been using here Serg. Perhaps yours simply has a flaw, as the Peavey I have has never blown a fuse, and I think I've had it roughly ten years or so.
     
  5. kserg

    kserg

    Feb 20, 2004
    London, UK
    ya... killing myself could be a problem:/ i've done some repair but nothing major:/ it be nice to get it if i can fix it... problem is i dono if i can

    Thanks for advice:]

    Jazzbo: ya... its prity sweet... i was hoping i could fix the sucker myself... 40$ for amp isnt too bad:p was kinda hoping some1 on forum had same problem and could tell me how hard it is to fix it and what i need for it:p

    Thanks fellas i geuss if i dont see easy way of fixing that one i'll keep looking:p pain of playing on bro's mixer connected to dual 600watt speakers when u suck:p

    Cheers
     
  6. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    The problem is most likely a bad output transistor (the ones on the metal heatsink) or a bad capacitor somewhere in either the power supply or the power amp. Or...it could be a faulty component elsewhere.

    Perhaps you can pull the amp chassis out (just five screws IIRC) and look for anything that's burned up. Also look to see if some debris is laying in the amp causing a short circuit.

    When I bought mine (for $10) it was in two pieces. The chassis was out and just hanging by the speaker wire. All I needed to do was replace the input jack and put the amp back together. I did a careful search for stray metal inside the amp before I ever plugged it in.
     
  7. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    My thought is that if the amp works at all, the problem is most likely a bad reservoir capacitor; if it were a bad output transistor, the amp would not be likely to work at all. If the amp's bias is set too high, then it could also consume more current than usual.
     
  8. kserg

    kserg

    Feb 20, 2004
    London, UK
    heh... intresting:/

    i geuss i could get it down to 20$ and then try fixing it... if i cant its only 20$ and some fun messing with electric stuff which i like:] if i fix it double the plesure and amp for 20$:p

    If i kill myself you will hear be on the news and i become famouse stupid guy who put his toung on a transformater:p

    Thanks billy for input and all:/


    edit nm maybe i shouldent... to much trouble:p

    Cheers
     
  9. I'd suspect a DC power suppy problem so I'd lean towards a reservoir capacitor. Or possibly the bridge rectifier, though I dunno if it would fail intermittently.
     
  10. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    The caps in question are those two big gray things on the other side of the thermal sensor (heatsink mounted device with the yellow colored wires attached to it.)
     
  11. DirkLanceFan

    DirkLanceFan Guest

    May 8, 2003
    Dallas, Tx, USA
    It could be the grounder, if I calling this wrong its the long bar on the power cord.then again I really dont about amps that, much my guitarist was telling me that I shouldn't had cut that part off the power cord to my old practice amp, I guess he was right because my old amp f****d up. :bassist:
     
  12. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    No, that's more of a safety issue. Cutting off the ground on your AC plug is likely to make you famous more for a Darwin Award than for your playing.