Practice Routine -Slap specific-

Discussion in 'Rockabilly [DB]' started by jasonrp, Sep 9, 2016.


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  1. jasonrp

    jasonrp

    Feb 19, 2015
    vt
    Do any of you guys have an ironclad routine that you use to work on different slaps? I'll get out a book of sheet music and the metronome while working on general stuff so I'm killing 3 birds with one stone but for the harder stuff, such as drags or triplets, I prefer to just concentrate on them. To do this I'll play scales and work different slaps between the notes but it's very boring after a while. Once I get bored, I'll through on youtube and play along with songs but That fells more like I'm working on the song, not the slap technique.


    QUICK VERSION: How do you work on your slaps? To music? To metronome? To video?.....Wing it?
     
  2. Remyd

    Remyd

    Apr 2, 2014
    St. Louis, MO
    Personal experience only, FWIW. I'm bad at slap. I know I'm bad at slap. My wife thinks it's the strings. It's not. The band says I'm a million times better than I was, but that's not true either. I haven't got the mechanics where I want them and triples are way beyond me right now. Thought my time sense was good before, but I doubt it now. I need a teacher, also money to pay for that teacher.

    When I'm bad at musical things (depressingly often), I go back to basics - scales and metronomes. That's led me to a routine that I've been running since May, working on a different aspect every so often. Daily, it's bounce the strings off the board, then do it again with a counterpoint slap, then do the counterpoint only, then doubles, then the whole burrito together. I'm mostly all in 1st position, running the click between 90-140, major scales in quarter notes. Then, I can play the tunes where I do a little clickityclacking and try to get some interesting sounds more than |:note-slap-note-slap-note-slap-note-double:| Previous "aspect" practice was volume control between notes and percussives and especially doubles, which went OK. The band wrote a half dozen non-slap songs in between, so I dropped off for a while to write some lines for those. I've been back to it the last week or two and have been working on speed for bluegrass, but it's a disaster.
     
  3. jasonrp

    jasonrp

    Feb 19, 2015
    vt
    When you use the 'nome do you set up 1/4 notes or do you use the triplets and 16th settings? I've done both but with the triplets and 16ths I'm paying so much attention to the metronome that I suffer. Instead I just set up 1/4 notes (sometimes only beat 2 and 4) and throw whatever in between. It's probably not perfect though
     
  4. jasonrp

    jasonrp

    Feb 19, 2015
    vt
    What do you mean by counterpoint? The click after you pluck (snap)? or the slap before you hit the note?
     
  5. Remyd

    Remyd

    Apr 2, 2014
    St. Louis, MO
    I guess I mean something like, note(one)-e-slap(and)-a-note(two) as counterpoint. I'm not sure the terminology. - I always think of it as "the clack". It's when you slap the board once, right between beats (or notes if you're not playing straight quarters).
     
  6. Adam Booker

    Adam Booker Supporting Member

    May 3, 2007
    Boone, NC
    Endorsing Artist: D'Addario Strings, Remic Microphones
    Metronome set to click beats 2 and 4 and try to line up the back beat. I also go through melodies from the real book. A great example of this is Milt Hinton playing Back Home Again in Indiana.
     
    HateyMcAmp likes this.
  7. jasonrp

    jasonrp

    Feb 19, 2015
    vt
    I've got a fairly long work commute so this morning I brought my beater korg metronome with me. I set it up with two beats and just go to town doing random slaps on the wheel. To make it tricky, I'll turn the volume down and keep switching up slaps then turn it back up and see if I'm still on the beat. I'm sure it will improve my time, I can tell that already, and it's actually kind of fun.

    The only downfall is that the clicks get driven into your head like a catchy song. Walking at work, I was thinking "Click, beep, click beep" for every step
     
    Eyesee7 likes this.
  8. Just do everything very very slow. 50 bpm slow. it's easier to figure things out, solidify your time (because slap bass with bad time is terrible and very prevalent), even out the pulls and slaps (or not, depending on what effect you are after).

    I think a lot of people want to do crazy fast slapping, so they practice very fast, struggle, then convince themselves they are bad at slapping. Assuming proper setup, 5 minutes a day at a slow speed is all that is necessary for most people to get the hang of basic slaps in a couple of weeks IMHO.
     
    johnny_bolt likes this.
  9. jasonrp

    jasonrp

    Feb 19, 2015
    vt
    Donovan Stokes' etudes have been a pretty good warmup/practice for me lately.
     
  10. I'll have to learn to read sheet music, I won't learn a crap by playing songs. I also practice my slaps when driving and generally always when my hands are free. I find it helps a lot for the slap timing and also my arm doesn't get tired of slapping so fast as it used to about 8 months ago.
     
  11. jasonrp

    jasonrp

    Feb 19, 2015
    vt
    The metronome in car routine has worked wonders for me. I'll never claim to have rock solid time but it is better than it has ever been. I'd recommend learning to read notes for anyone too. It really helped me get a better understanding of music.
     
  12. That's why i want to learn to read them too, most of the music and practice scales etc. for double bass are written in sheet music and i am frustrated for not understanding them. also i believe learning to play from them makes me to learn the neck faster too. Now i have small white dots in the side of the neck that tell me where notes are, and i try to think which note i play whilst playing songs i know, i want to be able to play any note from any string if someone asks me to. Now it takes about 10 seconds to think if someone says for example ''play the c note from a step higher, on the d string''
     
  13. jasonrp

    jasonrp

    Feb 19, 2015
    vt
    Try saying/singing the notes while you're playing scales in the cycle of fifths. Do scales from easy strings (C on third "fret"of A string) and alternate (C on 8th "fret" of E string). That helped me lock them in really fast. Wherever you can manage try to do 2 octave scales.

    I think scales are the fastest way to learn notes on the fingerboard. If you play them in the cycle of fifths/ fourths, you are brushing up on your musical keys too at the same time.

    I leave slaps out of that stuff and just focus on the sheet and notes BUT I do play scales also to warm up on double and triple slaps. Just not when I'm working on my notes and sight reading.
     
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