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Practicing scales / arpeggio's etc. for down tunings

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Thomas Kievit, May 20, 2012.


  1. Thomas Kievit

    Thomas Kievit Guest

    May 19, 2012
    Hello everybody!

    Around the end of the summer I wanna buy a 6 string bass and tune it down 1 step (A-D-G-C-F-Bb). I want to make that my standard tuning, cause I like the sound so much! Can someone tell me how I can practice scales or arpeggio's or something to get used to the sound and of course finding the correct notes?
     
  2. No substitute for just practice, here. You're still in fourths, so the patterns won't change from "standard" bass tuning. Find the notes on the fingerboard and learn them, then just keep going how you would with any standard tuning.

    I feel like I haven't understood the question, though...
     
  3. Thomas Kievit

    Thomas Kievit Guest

    May 19, 2012
    Thanks for your message!

    I know it looks a bit silly what I posted, but I meant that since I'm gonna down tune one step, the notes on the fretboard will move up with 2 frets. So I thought that I had to start all over again with playing scales, arpeggio's etc. So let's say for example that I play B major scale, it won't be on the same frets / position as in standard B-E-A-D-G-C tuning. Made that sence to you?
     
  4. JTE

    JTE Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2008
    Central Illinois, USA
    No, it won't be on the same frets, but the relative positions don't change at all. You can do this kind of practice anyway without the instrument- it's mostly mental after all.

    I don't own a six-string, but lately have been "practicing" diatonic major scales by envisioning where the notes are on a six-string tuned BEADGC. Do the same thing now, and when you get your six, you'll be ahead.

    See, the key physical component of practicing scales and arpeggios isn't that the key of B is different from the key of Bb, but how they're the same.

    John
     

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