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Practising Properly

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by wishface, Jul 13, 2012.


  1. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    I'm trying to develop better picking and develop both right hand fingers (i use 2 fingers, standard). How much time should I spend each day?
     
  2. Mousekillaz

    Mousekillaz

    Nov 25, 2009
    Anacortes Wa.
    All that you possibly can. And certainly more than you spend practicing spelling! :eyebrow:
     
  3. Fergie Fulton

    Fergie Fulton

    Nov 22, 2008
    Braintree
    Retrovibe Artist rota
    Set your goals first of all

    Work on your plucking hand seperate.

    Learn to alternate your two fingers on one string and one note.
    That is it once you can do that you can then easly adapt it to be moved around and cross strings.
    Do it nice and slow and count 1234 1234 1234 etc as you do it.
    Then learn to count it as 1234 2234 3234 4234 5234 6234 7234 etc. you just change the first number to relate to the bar number, so when you have to count off bars you know where you are and how many you count off. Depending on your technique and what you want to play will determine on how you approach techniques.

    The fretting hand needs a bit more attention, but the basics are about keeping the wrists as straight as need be to handle the music you play.
    It depends on how long you have been playing and what you are looking to develop.
    The two main techniques for fretting are the use of one finger per fret (OFPF ) and the technique of 124 ( Simandl....do a search on him).

    As the name suggests OFPF gives each separate finger the task of playing a note, but in 124 the ring and little finger share the task.
    This becomes apparent when playing below the 7th fret where distance between frets is larger so the hand requires more span. For some that span is to much strain for OFPF, so 124 is substituted for it instead. Most player will mix the two when playing.

    Practice exercises above the 7th fret, then when the hands are stronger and more toned slowly but slowly move the exercise down. The larger frets will give again set any challenge for any skills learned.

    For some more info and ideas, see the link follow it to the video channel where there are more videos on the to watch and some good tutorials from other players.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/FergieFultonBass/videos
     
  4. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    It's not so much a matter of TIME as it is approach, what are you doing to work on "developing" your right hand?
     
  5. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    playing scales up and down the neck (going through the modes up to the octave and back down) and in various intervals.
     
  6. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Try this, by the time you finish you'll have developed independance and eveness of attack.
     
  7. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    I'm specifically looking to improve my right hand.

    I have the Bass Fitness book, which i've had for years but never seriously used. That alone could take all day to practise (and you still wouldn't have enough time for all the exercises).

    It isn't for want of things to practice, it's trying to find the most efficient and effective methodology to improve my technique.
     
  8. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    Well, if you know what to practice, all that is required is time (LOTS of it), patience, and repetition, until you are happy that you have nailed a particular thing. Then move on to the next exercise, rinse and repeat. ;)

    I honostly dont know any other way.
     
  9. Fergie Fulton

    Fergie Fulton

    Nov 22, 2008
    Braintree
    Retrovibe Artist rota
    Then a good teacher is your answer, because you are not qualifed to judge your own situation, therefore the best way out of it.
    Now that may be getting a small set of review lessons.
    What they do is identify your problems, give you solutions and then allow you to work on them at your own time..

    My standard review lesson is a minimal 3 hrs. for example.
    So that is 3 hrs. of a player life to give them ideas to improve and work on....even if they never come back for more they have seen their problems addressed.
     
  10. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    paying for lessons isn't an option I'm afraid.
     
  11. Fergie Fulton

    Fergie Fulton

    Nov 22, 2008
    Braintree
    Retrovibe Artist rota
    Of course it's an option, you just can't justify it.
     
  12. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    No it's not an option because I can't afford it.

    And where I live there are no bass teachers anyway.

    Please do not make assumptions about what you think I mean. I mean what I say when I post. I dont' talk in riddles and I don't use doublespeak.
     
  13. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    No, you misunderstand. WHat I mean is there are lots of exercises to choose from, all over the internet. That book I mentioned alone could take up your entire life. So how do you decide what is the best way to spend your time to improve your technique, what exercises are best?
     
  14. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    No. I think you misunderstand me :p


    As I said, find a technique that you are comfortable playing, that suits the music you want to play.....and simply PRACTICE IT, till you can do it in your sleep. I dont know the book you mention, but I'm sure all the exercises have their uses. There are no "bests". Pick the ones that appeal to, and work for you and practice them.

    People here have given you lots of good advice and links ( the Scott Devine one for instance) to technique. It is up to you to do the work.
     
  15. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
  16. kevteop

    kevteop

    Feb 12, 2008
    York, UK
    His spelling is correct. You should practise what you preach. :p :p :D
     
  17. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland

    +1.

    Sorry to go off topic, but this caught my eye, so I checked it out. According to "Collins English Dictionary" :

    "It is extremely common for people to confuse the noun practice which has a c,, and the verb practise, which has an s."

    So Mousekillaz, perhaps you should check out your facts first, before slagging someone else. :p
     
  18. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    It confuses you that I ask the same question in multiple forums? Why on earth would that be confusing? I still haven't really received an answer. This is a bass forum, recommedning a teacher is fine but refusing to accept that I can't afford nor find teachers is absurd. I am trying to find a decent practice methodology. So for instance, how does on approach the Bass Fitness book I mentioned?

    Is this level of pedantry really necessary?
     
  19. Fergie Fulton

    Fergie Fulton

    Nov 22, 2008
    Braintree
    Retrovibe Artist rota
    Correction, it is accepted that you cannot afford afford lessons. Justification is your acceptance, not mine,of your situation.
    What you do, without seeming mean or insulting, is your business, it has no bearing on what I do or say, as does other peoples opinions on what your post is about.

    The reason you need a teacher, is because they see things different to you because you cannot see it.
    When you read the posts is this thread do you see criticism or advice?

    Fact is, any of it can be taken in either context, the fact you see criticism rather than advice is your take on it, but maybe someone next to you will see it different. That is the point of a teacher, he does not always see what you see.

    Last summer I had a boy come to me for lessons who had nothing, so he cut my grass once a week for a lesson once a month....that's how he justified his efforts.
    So sit back and look at how you use your money and time, and I'm sure you will find a way to get what you want.
    If there are no teachers near you, then maybe you define "near you" to suit your own views.
    I personally used to travel a 6 hr round trip each weekend for a year to do my studies, and I also traded services for instruction and also for equipment.

    Even on this form Scott Devine offers free lessons full of great stuff to get you going......but you need to make it happen, you need to justify to yourself why you need to do it, not why you can't.
    If that sounds like pseudo-science, then when you are older and look back you will be able to judge it, but if you are that older person then the situation you are in sort of proves the point of it.

    I hope all works out for you, and you find the path for you.:)
     
  20. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    No. Asking questions on forums is a healthy way of learning. What confuses me is why you have not seemed to act on any of the very useful and helpful (IMO) information you have received. No sooner have you received helpful replies here, then you go elsewhere and ask the same questions on another forum, and receive basically the same replies. That's your prerogative, but have you practiced any of the information you have received so far ? Seems to me that you spend your time being negative, and have an aversion to getting down to the nitty gritty, by trying to work things out for yourself.

    IMO people have given you plenty of great advice and tips, both here and on the other forum. My final piece of advice FWIW, is.....less computer....more bass practice.


    Best of luck with it. :)



    BTW, sorry to have upset you with my little spelling lesson. :p
     

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