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Programmes for an iBook

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by parrott, Mar 31, 2002.


  1. okay, so i've been given an iBook for a long time........

    it's an oldish one, one of the clamshell ones, but i've been given it because my band is instrumental, and needs some visualisation thing to go on to help us look more interesting.
    we're looking for something like the iTunes visualisation thing, except going along with us live, and some midi too.

    the thing is, all the band, and those around us, are PC buffs, so none of us have any idea what to do.

    so what should we do?
    what programmes should we use?

    none of use have any idea, so any thougths will be useful.
     
  2. Wxp4759cb

    Wxp4759cb

    Nov 23, 2000
    Kansas City, MO
    I'm not really sure what your asking for, but first I'd get OS X. Most music programs for pc are also on mac. Macs are actually alot better for music in most cases. I wish I had one.
     
  3. Nails

    Nails

    Jun 4, 2000
    Austin, Tejas
    I disagree on getting OS X, but do agree that Macs are better for music (I say better in all areas myself, except price.) The reason I say hold off is not all music software for Mac is OS X ready yet. Although I don't know of any programs that can pull the iTunes visual thing in real time to what it "hears" live.

    But for the MIDI stuff I might be able to help, MIDI's a hobby of mine. So what do you want the MIDI stuff to do? Will it play a hardware unit (rack synth, keyboard one of you may have, etc.), or will it play virtual synths? I've always heard that Steinberg's Cubase is where it's at for MIDI on Mac or PC (personally I'm a Pro Tools guy, but I've used Cubase and had no problems with it.) Most virtual synths are compatable (VSTi), the control capability is quite high, and it's pretty easy to operate once you learn it. If you plan on using virtual synths, the iBook, Cubase, and the virtual synths will be all you need. However, if you plan on getting, or all ready have, a hardware unit then you'll need a MIDI port, a 1 in/1 out would be enough for one, maybe two, synths. Just remember to hook everything up the same way you have it at home/rehearsal space when you go to play live or your sounds will play the wrong parts.
     
  4. Wxp4759cb

    Wxp4759cb

    Nov 23, 2000
    Kansas City, MO
    That is a good point on OS X, but most of the programs will be out for it soon, and OS X can run alot of prior version software.

    Nails, are macs capable of using soundfonts (or is the sound good enough they don't even need them?)?

    As far as midi I use a program called Sibelius. It is a notator, not a sequencer though (although you can play into it, and have it control devices). It is excellent. It is what is in use at the Kansas City Conservatory, so that is why I use it.
     
  5. Nails

    Nails

    Jun 4, 2000
    Austin, Tejas
    Chris,

    OS X does have an OS 9 emulation, but many of the non-OS X programs don't run in it. Even those that do work I've heard they don't work as well, I mainly hear of the program running slower. Of course you could partion the hard drive, or get an extra hard drive, then put OS 9.1 or 9.2 on one of the partions or hard drives and OS X on the other and boot into whatever you need to use at any given time. Nothing wrong with getting OS X now though, but for the time being I'm holding off for Pro Tools to be OS X compatable.

    Macs are capable of using soundfonts as long as it has a SoundBlaster sound card. At least that's what the soundfonts website says. However if you're using virtual synths you have a large amount of control and could save whatever sounds you create so soundfonts might not be that valuable. In this case I don't think soundfonts would be usable, since the iBook doesn't have PCI slots, unless there's a SoundBlaster card that is made specifically for laptops. Sound cards are a weak area of mine, so I won't say there's no way it can be done.
     
  6. Wxp4759cb

    Wxp4759cb

    Nov 23, 2000
    Kansas City, MO
    What are virtual synths?
    Thanks,
     
  7. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
  8. ChlkDstTtr

    ChlkDstTtr Guest

    Feb 15, 2002
    Seacoast New Hampshire
    Actually using the classic environment works quite well, and I haven't found a program that doesn't work with it (although some tend to crash after a while, but OS 9 had that problem anyway).

    As for partitioning and booting from seperate drives. This is unneccary. After you install OS X you will be asked to install OS 9 (on the same drive). Once that's installed you can go into the system preferences and can choose which system to boot up under.

    I'm sure you can find something though. Try going to http://www.apple.com/downloads/macosx/ and http://www.macosxapps.com/ to see if you can find anything. Also if you set it up right you could even get iTunes to do, but that would be somewhat difficult.
     
  9. Nails

    Nails

    Jun 4, 2000
    Austin, Tejas
    I'm using 9.1 and the only programs that have ever crashed on me have been Microsoft products. Since I'm in college and have to type practically everything, Simple Text wasn't providing the flexibility I need. So I got Office for Mac from the campus computer store (for a price that is unimaginable compared to what this bundle costs in stores.) But all Mac native software works without a hitch. And the Microsoft software has to be running for hours on end before it will crash.

    As for the partitioning issue (I realize now that I wasn't spelling partition right and now I feel a little silly about it), I based my statements on what I've heard from Pro Tools users. Essentially all I've heard is Pro Tools will scream, curse at your mother, then crash if you try to open it on the same partition or hard drive with OS X. Obviously not all software is like that, but some of it is.

    Chris-
    A virtual synth is essentially putting a hardware synth into software form. JMX gave some good examples. Some could be compared to a Pod in that they emulate classic synthesizers (like Moogs for example), others create sounds all their own by the user "turning knobs" that variables assigned to the knob (like decay, reverb level, oscillator, and other things I'm to ignorant to try to explain.)
     
  10. Wxp4759cb

    Wxp4759cb

    Nov 23, 2000
    Kansas City, MO
    Those soft-synths look cool, and I'm sure they are good at what they do, but thats not really what I need. I use a notator (Sibelius), and just need very realistic sounding real world instruments ex. trumpet. Right now I just use soundfonts. Is there a good mac equivilent other than just using outboard synths?
    Thanks,
     
  11. Nails

    Nails

    Jun 4, 2000
    Austin, Tejas
    Chris, there is soundfonts for Mac, but my guess would be soft synths would work better. But that's just my uninformed guess having no experience with soundfonts, and I've only dabbled with soft synths (so take that into consideration when weighing my opinion.) If you're looking for "non-synthy" sounds you might want to check out a software sampler, or a hardware sampler if you desire. How are you planning on using this, will it be live or studio?

    Basically you could assign each sound to certain MIDI channel and control it with that notation software you mentioned. As long as the sampler has enough memory to hold all the sounds, and enough polyphony so notes won't drop out, you could play 16 instruments at once.
     
  12. ChlkDstTtr

    ChlkDstTtr Guest

    Feb 15, 2002
    Seacoast New Hampshire
  13. ChlkDstTtr

    ChlkDstTtr Guest

    Feb 15, 2002
    Seacoast New Hampshire
  14. Wxp4759cb

    Wxp4759cb

    Nov 23, 2000
    Kansas City, MO
    Really I just like my scores to sound good while I'm working on them, and presenting them to people. Once I get them done, and accepted I usually get real instrumentalists to play the parts, and record that.