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putting on new strings

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Cz93, Apr 4, 2009.


  1. Cz93

    Cz93

    Jan 4, 2009
    about how much string should u have past the tuning post so i wont get too many or too little wraps around it.

    about the length of the palm of ur hand sideways is good?
     
  2. Cz93

    Cz93

    Jan 4, 2009
    ?
     
  3. It really doesn't matter how many wraps. Just put it through the saddle hole, then i like to go ahead and put a bend at the tip of the string by putting in in the tuning mecanism and bending it down to give it a 90 degree bend. then just start wrapping. To make it look good start at the top and work your way down it.
     
  4. fenwickbacker

    fenwickbacker

    Jun 12, 2004
    New Orleans
    I let the extra string go 2 tuning pegs beyond the one you're stringing.

    For example - on the E string, cut the excess at the D string tuner. You have to estimate it for the D and G strings, but it's worked for me. Not sure if it's an old wives' tale, but I remember being told to bend the end of the string before you cut.
     
  5. I never cut mine, and it strings fine.
     
  6. I usually do the 2 string pegs thing as well.
    Pull the E string taught and cut it at the D strings peg.
    Pull the A string taught and cut it at the G strings peg.
    Pull the D string taught, then hold the string at the peg, and pull it back to the A strings peg, and cut it at the G strings peg.
    Pull the G string taught, then hold the string at the peg, and pull it back to the A strings peg, and cut it at the G strings peg.
    (Wow, how many "strings" and "pegs" did i just type)

    On a tremolo equipped guitar, its best to tie the string sort of in a knot around the peg, and with as few winds as possible, so that the string cannot stretch and slip when you use the tremolo. Basses on the other hand are almost always hardtails, so the possibility of stretching and slipping is much less that on a tremolo equipped guitar, so you can have as many or few windings as you want without much difference.

    Worth noting, the more wraps you put on the peg, the further down the string goes towards the headstock, so the better tension you get at the nut.
     
  7. Bassamatic

    Bassamatic keepin' the beat since the 60's Supporting Member

    Yes - there should be about 3 turns or so around the peg when you are finished. There should not be so many windings that they start to overlap on top of each other. This will cause tuning problems.
     
  8. It's a huge pet peeve of mine to see a guitar/bass with messy string ends dangling all over the place. It looks really stupid and it can take an eye out of your not careful.

    I have absolutely no respect for a player who is too lazy to keep up with even the simplest maintenance on his instrument.
    It's as simple as taking a pair of cutters and snipping the ends after you string, which takes about 5 seconds of work.
     
  9. Having too many windings leads to issues with staying in tune. Leave that to sloppy guitars.
     
  10. FunkMetalBass

    FunkMetalBass

    Aug 5, 2005
    Phoenix, Arizona 85029
    Endorsing Artist: J.C. Basses
    It depends on the string, as tuners don't allow for as many windings with thicker strings. I usually cut mine 2-3" past the tuner. If it ends up being too long (and you'll know well before you ever get the string up to pitch), it's easy to unwind it and trim it a bit more.
     
  11. seanm

    seanm I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize! Supporting Member

    Feb 19, 2004
    Ottawa, Canada
    I cut 6" past the tuner. That gives me three full winds on the E and A strings. I play P basses and it is important to get a few winds on the low strings to get a good break over the nut.
     
  12. FunkMetalBass

    FunkMetalBass

    Aug 5, 2005
    Phoenix, Arizona 85029
    Endorsing Artist: J.C. Basses
    What about one of those string trees that provide that same downward angle? I know Sadowsky uses them on many of their basses due to lack of angled headstock.
     
  13. seanm

    seanm I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize! Supporting Member

    Feb 19, 2004
    Ottawa, Canada
    That could work. My Lakland has that. But I have never really looked into it for my P basses. As long as you get three good wraps (maybe four if you use really light strings), you won't have a problem.

    The image below shows the break for the E string. The A string is not as good, but I find it still works fine. Sorry for the fuzziness of the silk wrappings, these strings have been on and off this bass a few times ;)
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Jeff K

    Jeff K Supporting Member

    Jul 9, 2005
    Memphis, TN
    2 1/2 - 3" past the post is what I usually use.
     
  15. Tehrin Cole

    Tehrin Cole

    Mar 6, 2009
    Brooklyn,New York
    Endorsing Artist:Kustom Amplifiers
    That depends on a few factors:1;The brand of bass that you play, 2;The scale length of your instrument, 3;The size of your machine heads. For example,I play Fender Jazz Basses,with a standard 34" scale,and large machine heads,so I don't cut my strings at all.I like to have anywhere from 4,to 5 windings,per machine head.After I get all of the strings onto the instrument,I then tug each string,as I tune them to pitch,....I do this one string at a time,until all of my strings STAY in pitch,when I play.This gives my instruments,a relaxed feel under my hands,due to having "less stress",so to speak,on the instrument.Make sure your windings are stacked evenly,with the last winding(the one that starts its excursion down the neck)on the bottom.By winding your strings,tightly onto the machine heads,this will 1:keep your intonation true,2:make future tunings quicker,and easier,3:make your instrument feel more relaxed,under your hands.This process varies on shorter scale instruments,and instruments with smaller machine heads,where you do,in fact,have to cut your strings. In any case,my suggestion to you would be to try and have anywhere from 4,to 5 windings,per machine head. Peace!
     
  16. adube810

    adube810

    Mar 6, 2008
    Brooklyn, NY
    my rule of thumb is that you ideally want 2 or 3 good wraps around the post then stick it through the hole and start tuning up. if there is extra slack in the string by the tuning post, while keeping the downward pressure on the string keeping it in place, twist the string in the direction so the tension goes toward the nut and keep tuning up and that will dissapear.
     
  17. Tehrin Cole

    Tehrin Cole

    Mar 6, 2009
    Brooklyn,New York
    Endorsing Artist:Kustom Amplifiers
    Be careful about winding your string around the post BEFORE tuning.This can cause your strings to twist,causing 1;poor intonation,and 2;premature string breakage.Try,and set the end of your string into the well,first,...then proceed to wind the tuners.This takes a little longer,but trust me,....in the end,you'll be glad you did! Peace!
     
  18. 76JazzRay

    76JazzRay

    Mar 30, 2009
    Arizona
    From Fender's website for Fender Basses
    "TUNING KEYS
    How you wind the strings onto the pegs is very important. Start by loading them through the bridge and then loading them onto the appropriate keys as follows:

    Standard keys. Pre-cut each string for the proper length and desired amount of winds. Pull the fourth string 3" (76 mm) past its tuning post and cut it (make sure to pull each string taut). Insert through the eyelet in the tuning key, allowing approximately 1/16" (1.6 mm) of the end to extend through the eyelet, then wind neatly in a downward pattern, being carefull to prevent overlapping. Pull the third string 3 1//2" (89 mm) past its tuning post, cut it, and repeat the winding procedure. Pull the second and first strings 3 1/2" (89 mm) past their tuning posts and cut and wind as noted. For five-string basses, cut the fifth string 3" (76 mm) past its tuning post and repeat the same cutting and winding procedure.

    Vintage keys. Pre-cut each string for the proper length and desired amount of winds. Pull the fourth string 4" (102 mm) past its tuning post and cut it (again, make sure to pull each string taut). Insert into the center hole of the tuning key, bend and crimp to a 90° angle, and wind neatly in a downward pattern, being carefull to prevent overlapping. Pull the third string 4 1/2" (114 mm) past its tuning post, cut it, and repeat the winding procedure. Pull the second and first strings 4 1/2" (114 mm) past their tuning posts and cut and wind as noted. For five-string basses, cut the fifth string 3 1/2" (89 mm) past its tuning post and repeat the same cutting and winding procedure."
     

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