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Qualified bass teachers in the UK

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by DaveBeny, Oct 18, 2001.


  1. DaveBeny

    DaveBeny

    Mar 22, 2000
    London, UK
    Does anyone know where I might find a list/register of "qualified" bass teachers, ie. people who have seriously studied on a recognised program. I've had a couple of unsatisfactory teachers in the past, and the quality of their teaching methods was poor, I have to say. I'm looking for some private tuition from a teacher that is going to assess my ability and teach me properly, ie. theory and reading, rather than showing me a few flashy licks.

    David
     
  2. DaveBeny

    DaveBeny

    Mar 22, 2000
    London, UK
    Just replying to my own thread to send it to the top of the forum in the hope of a response!:)
     
  3. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I don't think there is such a thing - there is a large US list under the basslessons website but this only lists Steve Lawson for he UK! ;)

    I think the only option you have is to go to gigs and if you like the person's playing then ask them if they give lessons - of course this doesn't give you any idea of whether they are good teacher or not.

    It's the same for most instruments though - the trombone player in my group has been looking for a decent Jazz teacher for years without luck. But we went to see a group locally that included Annie Whitehead (very good UK -based player who is on a lot of CDs I own) and he plucked up the courage to ask and she has agreed.
     
  4. Steve Lawson

    Steve Lawson Solo Bass Exploration! Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2000
    Birmingham, UK
    Hi David

    there's the Registry of Guitar teachers, but from the experience of many many people that I know I'd say PROCEED WITH CAUTION - I know a lot of people who've had lessons from so-called qualified teachers who were rubbish. Personal recommendation is a far better way to go, and after that, trial and error. Sometimes you get a hunch that someone will be good or bad, and that can help, other times there will be good teachers who just aren't right for you - I'm sure there are some people that wouldn't get on with my style of teaching (hopefully not too many! :oops:), and if that was the case, I'd point them to someone else.

    Qualifications can be had by ticking the right boxes, they aren't really any real measure of someone's ability to connect with a student (same as any teaching qualification, really...)

    So, your best bet is to go and have a read of the quotes from my students on my website!!!!! <biggrin>

    cheers

    Steve
    www.steve-lawson.co.uk
     
  5. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I agree with Steve that it is very difficult to judge who is going to be a good teacher. I go along to Jazz workshops in Brighton quite frequently and some tutors are very good and get a lot out of the time and there are some who are just so bad as teachers that I avoid the session when I know they are going to be running it!
     
  6. DaveBeny

    DaveBeny

    Mar 22, 2000
    London, UK
    Well, I've checked out the website for the Registry of Guitar Teachers, and have phone numbers for three "qualified bass teachers" in Birmingham. I'll just have to ring one, and if I like the sound of him, book a trial lesson. If it doesn't work, I'll try the next one, and so on.

    And Steve, one day I'll make it down to London for a lesson! :)
     
  7. Steve Lawson

    Steve Lawson Solo Bass Exploration! Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2000
    Birmingham, UK
    David,

    one more thing - beware of anyone who teaches guitar and bass - I'm sure there are some people who teach both well, but most 'doublers' are much weaker in one area. While I can understand the need to make a living, it really is fleecing the students to offer tuition on an instrument that you're not really in a position to teach. I've got a heck of a lot of students who've had a bad experience with a teacher who had a bad experience with someone who taught both and basically viewed bass as an easy guitar with chunky strings!

    I could probably get away with teaching 'beginner' guitar, but would much rather point people to someone who has dedicated their life to finding out what guitar is all about and knows it on a deep level, rather than me who views it as a crap bass with thin strings... :oops:)

    good luck finding a teacher - and see you soon!!

    Steve
    www.steve-lawson.co.uk
     
  8. DaveBeny

    DaveBeny

    Mar 22, 2000
    London, UK
    Both of the "teachers" I've had in the past were guitar/bass doublers. One was a guy I found in the Yellow Pages. I remember getting to his front door for my first lesson, and thinking "please, please don't let him be a metal guy"! The door was opened by... a 50-something metal guy! His idea of teaching was to show me some major and minor arpeggios to run through whilst he "shredded" on his Parker Fly!

    The second teacher I had worked for 'Solihull Schools Music Services', basically travelling around different schools and colleges in the Solihull area to provide guitar/bass tuition. Half an hour once a week isn't much of a lesson, and sometimes he didn't even make it to the lesson! :rolleyes: I lent him my 'Jaco Pastorius: Modern Electric Bass' video just before the college terminated his contract because there were that many complaints about him. I've never got that video back. :( But hey, at least he showed me how to strum the riff from 'School Days'!!! :rolleyes: