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Quarter Turn - Stupid Question

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by christle, Jan 28, 2003.


  1. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    Here is my stupid question for the month. To adjust your truss rod a quarter turn am I right in interpreting that as turning the allen wrench 90 degrees from its original position?

    Sorry if this seems lame, however I want to start doing this for myself and want to understand this specific before I start to make adjustments.

    Dan
     
  2. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    1/4 of 360° = 90°
     
  3. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    I knew it was obvious but I was getting information from someone who seemed less informed than I am and it confused me. They stated that a quarter turn meant to turn the wrench one quarter of the distance between the string spacing at the headstock (Fender Jazz).

    Thank you.

    Dan
     
  4. :eek:


    glad you asked here. ;)

    :D:D

    Merls
     
  5. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    Me too :D I am adding TI's to my P bass and would like to do the adjustment myself. I had a tech do it on the Jazz (more expensive bass) and figure now is the time to learn for myself.

    Dan
     
  6. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    One quarter of the string spacing? Isn't that like 2 degrees?





    Hey JMX, how do you do the degree symbol? Is it an alt code?
     
  7. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    About 5
     
  8. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    Thanks Smash, I will go easy and let it settle in. With lower tension strings am I tightening or loosening the truss rod?

    Dan
     
  9. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    No, it's the first key in the top row of a German (qwertz) keyboard layout.

    It's ^ and shift-^ gives you °
     
  10. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    I know that when I had the bass tech do the setup on my Jazz, and I switched to TI Flats, he adjusted the neck and the action. To confirm, the first step here is to change the strings, then adjust the neck (slowly), and set the intonation. After that I set the action.

    This may still be an option, however I am inclined to do this myself.

    I hadn't thought about that but it makes sense.

    I really appreciate the help.

    Thanks,

    Dan
     
  11. Hey Christle, just a frame of reference - I have a 1996 Fender Precision and I just adjusted the truss rod about two weeks ago. The last time I made an adjustment was last April.

    The intonation was off on my F (8th fret, A string) so I used the instructions from an old Fender magazine to adjust the truss rod.

    - Capo'ed the first fret and held down the last fret of the E string. I measured the spacing under the 8th fret - it was 0.03".

    - I gave the truss rod a little less than an 1/8th turn. It was a bit tight but it moved with a little bit of pressure. I let it sit for 24 hours to adjust.

    - Next day, I remeasured the spacing under the 8th fret. It was about 0.015" - my ruler couldn't measure anything smaller than 0.03" so it was an educated guess based on what I saw the day before. Perfect.

    I would recommend that you adjust the truss rod first and use the standard measurements. The truss rod has a major impact on the intonation of the bass guitar and needs to be properly set.
     
  12. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    Thanks! That was very helpful. I am going to give it a go this weekend and see where I end up. I'll post if I run into any problems. I would love to have you show this in person but I live in WinterPeg (and yes its flippin' cold! :) )

    That would be cool. I managed to get the measurements from Mr. Gearhead and I found the BassPlayer article at home. As most players that come here like to find their information here a setup thread would be very welcome I would think.

    Dan
     
  13. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    Thanks rapid_granny. I will take that into account. I already know if I put another set of 7250's on the bass it will stay intonated (so far). My main concern is that by putting on TI flats, which have a significantly lower tension than the 7250's, I will get some bowing.

    You guys have been great with the help on this, I really do appreciate it.

    Thanks,

    Dan
     
  14. JayJay

    JayJay

    May 13, 2002
    Hey Chris,

    Hope it's not too late but you have to go really slow on turning your truss rod.

    Jus yesterday, I guess I was too quick for result or it could be that the fret job was not done well on my bass, I created a permanent buzz on the 17th fret on the A string by tightening the rod.

    I followed all the mentioned proper setup procedures (no more than 1/4 turn a day and allowing the bass to set-in for a day for repeating etc...) and I still get such heart-breaking experience.

    Well, it could also be inherent defect on the neck, fingerboard or fret work.

    SMASH, any recommendation on resolving the buzz besides raising up the action (maybe will not work too as I guess it's a non-reversible action). Guess that fret have been "forced up" a micro-meter to create that buzz. Imagine breaking a Kit-Kat bar by holding both ends and try to break it in two like in the commercials.

    Guess filling the neraby frets help but not skilled enough. Any others with similar experiences ?

    Jay
     
  15. JayJay

    JayJay

    May 13, 2002
    One more thing SMASH, I have already turn about a total of 1 complete round of the truss rod.

    Is it OK? now the neck is very close to what I desired but as I mentioned, there is this "damage" done to fret work.
     
  16. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.

    Jay: Chances are almost non-existant that adjusting the TR caused the 17 fret to raise.

    The truss rod puts almost no bend in the neck at F17. Because of the taper in the neck, the bend is contained to the first through around 8th fret.

    The neck stays relatively straight at the 17th fret.

    You may have a high fret that you haven't noticed before because the action was high enough to compensate for the problem.

    Its easy enough to visually check for a raised fret. Just look at the questionable fret under a good light with a magnifying glass. If the fret has raised it will be obvious.

    Remember that the lower one goes with the action, the more critical things like fret heigth become.

    I would suggest that you look at the fret for a "notch" worn into the fret by the string. Also check for a dent in the string at the point where it contacts the fret.

    If the visual checks confirm that you don't have a fret prob, simply raise the action a bit on the A string by raising the bridge saddle just to the point that the buzz disappears.

    If you have already went one full turn on the truss rod you probably will have to set the bass up completely. That is a VERY large change in the TR.

    It must have been a beast to play before you started.

    By the way, you didn't mention which way you turned the TR nut.

    Pkr2
     
  17. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    I finally got the strings changed and after almost 20 hours the neck hasn't buzzed at all. I am playing it to decide if the action should be changed or not. So far I like it, but that may change.

    I do have another question. I noticed that the E and D strings are somewhat flat at the 12th fret after the string change. I think this means I should move the saddle forward to shorten the string in order to improve the intontation. Is this correct?

    Thanks for the help,

    Dan


    BTW, Smash I like your MP3's, very well done.
     
  18. I believe that is correct. To 'sharpen' the pitch, make the length shorter which means moving the saddle closer to the neck.
     
  19. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    Thanks Pete. I found the answer on Gary Willis' web page as well. I am really starting to enjoy this setup stuff.

    Dan