question 2 of many more to come about site reading notation

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by cassanova, Jan 16, 2002.

  1. cassanova


    Sep 4, 2000
    I know the symbols for sharp and naturals, but im a bit confused on something relating to them.

    F is sharp in the key sig, so I know all of them will be played sharp.

    When I see a natural sign before an F in one of the bars or measures. I know this means to play that note as an F instead of F#, What Im not quite sure of is, if It cancels out all the F# in that bar/measure or if I just play that one note as F.

    Also Im seing # symbols after the key signature, but before certain notes. (like C) I know that means to play that particular note sharp. Then ill see the same thing a few notes, or even bars down the staff. What the heck do I do in there, Im thinking Im supposed to play all C notes sharp untill I reach the next sharp symbol and once i reach that all C notes should be played normal and not sharp.

    quick example and a crude one at that. starting with 4 E and Ah on bar one, then begining with 1 E and ah on bar 2,

    b...d....#c....b..| #c....g.....a....g

    Sorry if this sounds confusing, but I am confused about this.
  2. jazzbo


    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    By the by, what'ch'ya workin' on Half-a-mocha?
  3. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    I'm not sure, but I believe the accidental only applies to the note in that octave as well. But I could be wrong on this.
  4. Oysterman


    Mar 30, 2000
    I've seen charts that implied what you say, but I've also seen other pieces implying that it counted for all other octaves as well. I have no idea which way is right.
  5. jazzbo


    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    To the best of my memory it's always been all octaves. Now I'll have to go find something.
  6. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    This is correct, although it is common for a courtesy accidental (or natural) to be used in the other octaves of the same pitch when there is a deviation from the key signature.

    Either way, you're right - any accidental which represents a departure from the key signature affects only the specific pitch to which it is attached.
  7. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Get the tab and there won't be any confusion about whether or where the accidental applies.;)
  8. cassanova


    Sep 4, 2000
    actually it crytal clear. I kinda thought thats what i was supposed to do when I saw that. But wanted to remove the doubt i had about it.
    thank you.

    The Cello Suites

    I automaticly assumed the note and all its octave, my logic behind this, is a C is still a C even if its an octave higher.