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Question about chorus and noise suppressors

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by Blade3dge, May 12, 2011.


  1. Blade3dge

    Blade3dge

    May 19, 2009
    Hey guys ^_^

    So I'm a bassist in a pop-punk/hardcore band (by hardcore I mean "screamo ****" not hardcore punk). So obviously it's not really the genre for heavy effects just high gain on a mostly unedited tone, what's bringing me down though is I love the sexy "studio tone" that we get when recording stuff. As I understand it (and I may be wrong) aside from Ampeg imitation another studio trick to add depth to the sound and strengthen the bass tone is by adding some chorus in to the bass, I would love to bring this through to my live performance but it seems like every chorus video clip I see is using it as some trippy effect to make a bass seem ambient rather than powerful. So my question after all of that is...

    Can I use a chorus pedal to strengthen the tonal character of my bass and make it sound more full while keeping a lot of definition on the notes I play and keeping the sound reasonably "tight". I assume this would be achieved through a really fast chorus affect but I couldn't see any demos of this sort of sound out there so I'm worrying I might have just imagined the studio magic, haha. Also would you have any recommendations for me? I was looking at this one here since I'm a fan of true bypass pedals but if you want to point me in a better direction that would be great:

    NEW! TC Electronic Corona Chorus FX Pedal ~W/FREE GIFT! | eBay

    As for my Q on noise suppressors basically plugging my bass directly in to my amp and boosting to volume as is to be expected produces a low humming/hissing noise (likely due to the high gain I use on my head). Nothing unnatural or unexpected, just a little bit abrasive when I'm not playing any notes to cover the noise and its running through he PA. Now my pedals (literally a tuner and an EQ) do add to this noise but nothing I can't ignore, what I wanted to know is would putting a noise gate at the end of my pedal chain remove the noise, if all it would do is remove the noise my pedals add it's not worth my money and it's something that could be achieved by putting my pedals in to my effects loop rather than between my bass and my amp, but if it would silence my amp completely then it would be money well spent.

    Just to clarify my setup, I run my bass into a tuner and an EQ pedal then in to my amp, I don't run my pedals in the effects loops because to me the extra cables it would take to set it up seem counter-intuitive when my pedals are mostly silent and 90% of the noise occurs even when I run my bass directly in to my amp (it's not my cable, it's just loud amps being loud), would a noise suppressor... Suppress this noise? :p

    /rant
     
  2. Blade3dge

    Blade3dge

    May 19, 2009
  3. chuck norriss

    chuck norriss Banned

    Jan 20, 2011
    It sounds like Sting used a chorus pedal--can't say for sure--or he's getting a tactful, subtle chorus from his fretless. I'd suggest listening to Zenyatta Mondatta, Ghost In the Machine, &/or Synchronicity albums to get a sense of chorus used appropriately. Wait, I just said I'm not sure if he used it. What the hell. Anyway, I think it sounds stupid to use warbly, overworked effects on bass. They should be subtle if used (apart from dist/OD which is forgivable because Lemmy does so). One of the few & maybe the only person who can pull off using effects to no end is the guitarist, not bassist, Randy Randall of the band NO AGE. Guitarist.
    Don't waste your money on a noise suppressor. Trust me you don't want or need that crap. It's a novel idea, looks, sounds great in catalogs, but the truth is save your time money energy & apply it toward playing & creating music. Remember, Jaco plugged straight in. Hendrix, SRV, all the blues legends, plugged straight in.
     
  4. hendrix plugged straight into all kinds of effects, dude.
     
  5. Blade3dge

    Blade3dge

    May 19, 2009
    Please don't let this be a discussion on whether or not to use effects they never end pretty ;)
     
  6. bongomania

    bongomania Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    What bull. Total nonsense.
     
  7. Rebop

    Rebop

    Jul 9, 2008
    La Honda, CA
    All of them plugged into something before the amp.

    SRV. Ibanez tube screamer and mxr pedals.
    Hendrix. Fuzz, wah, etc.
    Jaco. boss chorus pedal, mxr delay.
     
  8. rob_thebassman

    rob_thebassman

    Jul 26, 2010
    Normanton, UK
    playing bass since 2005
    hendrix also used a fuzz octave :p
     
  9. Rebop

    Rebop

    Jul 9, 2008
    La Honda, CA
    Yes, all sorts of stuff. Hence my "etc".
     
  10. Blade3dge

    Blade3dge

    May 19, 2009
    So... about the original topic? :p
     
  11. bongomania

    bongomania Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    Fair enough. :) A chorus is probably not the effect you want. Chorus is cool for its own sake, but it has never been the tool for making a signal "stronger", and it's not the "studio trick" you think it is.

    9 times out of 10, when somebody asks about an effect to make their signal more powerful or rich or deep, the real deal is their amp is just not cutting it--and no pedal can fix that properly.

    An actual studio trick that is really used is double-tracking, recording the bass on two (or more) channels. Chorus was designed to imitate double-tracking, but it usually doesn't do a great job of that on anything other than vocals. So to duplicate that live, you can run two amp rigs side by side, or with one amp you can work out a parallel-blended signal chain with one "leg" clean and the other "leg" running though an overdrive. But with the parallel effects chain idea, you still have to have an adequate amp in order for it to sound great.
     
  12. Blade3dge

    Blade3dge

    May 19, 2009
    Except we didn't double track in the studio (I'm sure I'd remember if that happened, haha), it seemed to me like it was clearly some kind of chorus effect that was used to get the effect.

    Damn it haha, aside from splitting to two amps (which is unfeasible for me atm) any other ideas? Maybe it was a different kind of effect I'm looking for.
     
  13. bongomania

    bongomania Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    Can you post a clip of the track you're talking about?
     
  14. Blade3dge

    Blade3dge

    May 19, 2009
    Cupidfalls - Artist - triple j Unearthed - free music | new Australian music | independent music

    It's our old demos (nothing from our actual studio recording has been released yet), our guitarist recorded me for it and he said he was using a chorus effect to get the bass tone, unfortunately it's not a great mix so the bass isn't really present so this might just be a waste of time. I do plan to go down to my local guitar store today and give some of their chorus pedals a little test drive to see what I can do with them but for now what do you think? Also any thoughts on a noise suppressor? Thanks for the help ^_^
     
  15. sunbeast

    sunbeast Supporting Member

    Jul 19, 2006
    Los Angeles, CA
    For good use of chorus on bass, check out just about anything by The Cure, New Order, and a fair amount of Joy Division. Chorus does inherently add ambience, but I don't think that it necessarily saps "power" if done right. If used fairly subtly and with a fairly slow modulation rate (too fast and it gets to be too much like vibrato, and probably would bring too much attention to the effect), I think it can give a pretty good impression of doubling. One of the potential problems can be if the modulation extends too deeply into your low frequencies, which can cut punchiness from the bass (which would NOT be good for your band at all!).

    As far as the noise suppressor, it will only cut noise coming before the pedal, and only when you stop playing (are you sure the noise isn't from your bass, made louder by everything after it?)- this means that the noise will still be there in the background any time you are playing, and will be very audible if you sustain a note long enough that your bass signal approaches or is quieter than the noise signal. Basically, the noise will swell in and out with your playing dynamics- depending on how bad it is it may be worth it, but my experience is that I preferred using no noise suppressor to using my Decimator (and the Decimator is the best suppressor pedal available in my opinion).
     
  16. moe.moe

    moe.moe Endorsed by Mercy & Grace ™

    Jun 22, 2008
    Earth (for now)

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