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Question about Farting

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Youngspanion, Nov 17, 2010.


  1. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    What causes farting out? When I say Farting Out I mean that the notes start to sound alike and the overall sound is not clear. Like F and F# sound the same. Of course this goes away when I lower the volume. Is it a fault of the Speaker being pushed too hard? I notice it more on the Schroeder Mini12 then on the EpiPS112. Would it go away at high volumes if I add a 210 epi.

    I used the 2 12's together but It was still somewhat noticeable and the Shroeder sounds so much more nasily in comparison.
     
  2. recreate.me

    recreate.me

    Apr 2, 2010
    Ontario
    I had a 15" Legion cab that did that only on my dropped D string, and only at gigs.. It was a totally downer.

    I'm pretty sure it is because you are pushing the speaker to hard. When you add another cab into the mix the signal is split between the cabs so each speaker is doing less work. Adding more bass to the signal, through the EQ or by playing low notes can make it worse.
     
  3. SactoBass

    SactoBass A retired civil engineer who likes all-tube amps! Supporting Member

    I'm sure there will be a plethora of boring refried bean joke replies, but in your context, I believe farting out of a speaker is when its xmax is exceeded. That is usually due to overpowering of the driver with too much low frequency input.

    But I am no expert. Someone like Bill Fitzmaurice would be able to provide a much more accurate explanation of what causes speaker farting.
     
  4. eyeballkid

    eyeballkid Supporting Member

    Jul 19, 2009
    if you look at the spec sheets on just about any speaker the curve of volume (and therefore its perceivable definition) REALLY starts drastically dropping off below 40-45 hz. The louder your trying to play the more you will notice this as your approaching more and more the limits of the speakers potential.
     
  5. bassbrock

    bassbrock

    Feb 20, 2007
    Callahan, FL
    It is like SactoBass said... usually it is caused by the speaker exceeding maximum excursion (Xmax). Coneslap. It can also be caused by distortion due to preamp clipping or power amp clipping.

    To resolve the problem, roll off some low bass on your bass itself (if active) or the bass preamp.
     
  6. lowend1

    lowend1

    Feb 15, 2005
    I thought I was qualified to post an answer. Upon reading the original post, it is clear that my expertise is in another area. Sorry.:D
     
  7. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    Rolling off the lows works to reduce it but then I'm sacrificing the volume of the lows. Is there a way to alter this situation without the sacrifice? I'm thinking of adding a different cab to do this but I don't know if this is the answer.
     
  8. SactoBass

    SactoBass A retired civil engineer who likes all-tube amps! Supporting Member

    I think adding another cab would help. It would give you substantially more volume than a single cab, and you wouldn't have to drive the cabs as hard as you would with just a single cab, which would reduce the chance of farting out the single cab.
     
  9. recreate.me

    recreate.me

    Apr 2, 2010
    Ontario
    If you add another cab, the power sent to each speaker will be less, so it will help, but how much really depends on what the new cab is....
     
  10. greenboy

    greenboy

    Dec 18, 2000
    remote mountain cabin Montana
    greenboy designs: fEARful, bassic, dually, crazy88 etc
    That's one of several reasons I went with dedicated midrange speakers in my designs: So that I could actually use grown-up woofers with serious xmax and not have to gut my sound of low-end authority, and yet not have to haul so much real estate.
     
  11. klokker

    klokker

    Jan 7, 2009
    Steele City, NE
    I've been playing bass for a while now and I've never farted. Not once. But I never crank the bass on either my bass or amp.

    You can usually tell when your about to fart. Like others have said, its usually way to much bass for a given volume.
     
  12. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY

    OK. Thats the next question. What is the new cab gonna be?
    I really dig the tone from the Epi so I may consider that. But 210, another112 or Dare I say it. A 115? As stated, I have an Epi PS112.
     
  13. christw

    christw Get low!

    May 11, 2008
    Dayton OH
    THE MADDEST SCIENTIST
    I'd vote for any of the above. If it were me, I'd probably grab the 115.
     
  14. Go with another one of the same if you like the sound.

    In the meantime, cut the really low lows and bump mids/low mids up.
     
  15. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    +1. When you exceed xmax in the low end all sorts of nasties result, and this is one of them. The cure is simple, don't exceed xmax. Either turn it down, lower the bass EQ, or double your speaker count. Using long excursion woofers is an alternative to doubling the speaker count, but they also require a larger amp to make use of them, and a midrange driver. And at this point very few manufacturers offer cabs loaded with them.
     
  16. RickenBoogie

    RickenBoogie

    Jul 22, 2007
    Dallas, TX
    Here's a vote to add another identical Epi 12. Two of the same always equal more than the sum of the parts. It's the answer.
     
  17. SactoBass

    SactoBass A retired civil engineer who likes all-tube amps! Supporting Member

    Yeah baby! That's why I have a pair of fEarful-inspired 15/6's on order.
     
  18. SactoBass

    SactoBass A retired civil engineer who likes all-tube amps! Supporting Member

    ^^^THIS!!!
     
  19. SactoBass

    SactoBass A retired civil engineer who likes all-tube amps! Supporting Member

    In the OP's particular scenario, I agree with Rickenboogie's recommendation.
     
  20. Alex1984

    Alex1984

    Jan 16, 2010
    Vancouver
    If your question is who, it wasn't me! :p

    Anyhow, if you add a second cab, the cabs each receive less power so it should help a lot. However, you do need to mind the frequency responses of the drivers themselves too.
     

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