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Question about modes of major scale

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by BaSsDuDe230, Feb 10, 2002.


  1. When using the scale (lets say in C Major) it would be C D E F G A B c (hopefully :D) now for mode #1 (basic major scale) you would use c as root and do the ionion (sp?) scale. now for D would you use that as the root for the next scale? or C? and same for mode 3(E) 4(F) 5(G) 6(A) ect..? Is that right? Thanks
     
  2. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    yup!

    C ionian: C D E F G A B C
    D dorian: D E F G A B C D
    etc.
     
  3. yay! im so smart :rolleyes: thanks
     
  4. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Modes can be looked at either way - as subsets of existing scales, or as interval patterns that stand on their own. This thread has some pretty good stuff about both ways in it:

    http://talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=25385&perpage=20&pagenumber=1

    There are advantages to both ways of thinking, and working the concept out both ways often helps in getting a good solid grasp of the idea of modes. Feel free to ask more questions...in learning theory, there are no stupid questions except intentionally stupid ones.

    Good luck.


    THIS FISHBARREL
     
  5. Ok, thanks. I have no more questions but may soon :D
     
  6. The thing you got to remember is that if say you want the mode in G its the chord G maj (G,B,D) even though the scale for G maj has an F#. D Dorian is D min which has a Bb where as the aeolian (i can't spell) A is a minor which is simply a b c d e f g.

    To see if its in key you just gotta check the 1st, 3rd, 5th and anything specified (eg Dmin7).

    I think i said all that right - but i probably didn't
     
  7. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    I had a question regarding practical use of major scale modes. I have read in various books etc. that one can use this mode or that over various chord progressions (can't remember specific examples right now)...

    Anyway, I had assumed that the mode can be used because each note in each chord in the progression matches notes found in the mode. Is this correct?
     
  8. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    I think you're talking about key centers there. If you know (or can learn) enough theory to do simple harmonic analysis of a chord progression, you can learn to group chords together according to what overall key they belong to. When you do this, you can begin soloing in the ballpark by playing from the "parent scale" of the progression over all of the chords that come from that particular key. This "parent scale" will contain all of the modes that relate to each specific chord.

    In the link I posted, the chord progression to the standard, "I Love You" gets discussed and analyzed in this way. Is that what you're talking about?
     
  9. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    Thanks, MIST SPINSTERMOLD! Quite muchly appreciated!

    Actually, yes, I was referring to key centers. I've never actually jammed in this fashion - that is, matching key centres to chord progressions. In all the improv I've ever done, it went the other way - starting with a key and outlining changes based on that. I guess knowing the chords before you start would give you a chance to give your ears somewhat of a break ;)

    Many thanks again. I've been wondering about that for a while.