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Question about Ohms and power handling

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by reggierockz, Feb 7, 2006.


  1. reggierockz

    reggierockz

    Feb 7, 2006
    I am running a Hartke HA 4000 head, which power is 400 Watts at 4 Ohms and a Hartke 410XL cab with a power handling of 400 Watts @ 8 Ohms. I'm confused as too exactly what the difference in Ohms means. Can anyone clarify this for me? Also, given my setup, is it possible for me to overload too much power into my cab, or can it handle the max that the HA 4000 can pump out?

    Thanks,

    -reggierockz
     
  2. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    Your amp is rated at 400W when a 4ohm load is connected.

    Your speaker is capable of handling 400W, and is an 8ohm load.

    To get to a 4ohm load, you'd have to hook two of those cabinets up (which ends up making them in "parallel"), which is also a total of 800W power handling capability.

    With the one cab connected, your amp will be running with an 8ohm load, which also means it will be putting out LESS than 400W. Probably somewhere around 250-300W (it's not linear).

    So the short answer to your question is, yes, your cab can handle anything that head can throw at it... especially if you never feed it a severely distorted signal.
     
  3. reggierockz

    reggierockz

    Feb 7, 2006
    so hypethetically speaking, if my amp clips, or if i turn the volume all the way up, im not going to blow those nice aluminum cones?
     
  4. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    No, if you feed the speakers a distorted signal, then it depends on how abusive the signal is to the speaker. The power rating is based on a clean signal. Fuzz won't hurt them, but if you send them some harsh amp clipping, it could damage them. If you "jerk" the cones around a lot, the voice coils heat up, and bad things happen. Note that not all "distortion" is created equal.

    The bottom line is, if you want distortion, get a fuzz box. Otherwise, do whatever it takes to keep the signal clean.

    You do that, and your speakers will last a LOOONG time.
     
  5. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001

    Jun 17, 2004
    Ireland
    If you find your putting your amp into clipping I'd advise you to get a second speaker cabinet.

    It's always a good idea not to turn your amp all the way up. Leave a little headroom. It's also a bad idea to let your amp clip. With 200 watt output and a 400 watt cab I'd say there's still a good possability of doing some damage to the cab if you have your amp clipping.

    Its always best not to throw caution to the wind in terms of things like this.
     
  6. reggierockz

    reggierockz

    Feb 7, 2006
    gotcha
     
  7. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    "Jerking the cones around" doesn't damage them; it's excessive power or excessive low frequencies. When an amp clips, it's actually putting out more than its rated power.
     
  8. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    Ahhh, ok. I was always told it's what the squared off wave does to the cone movement, which causes heat to build up.