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Question about putting on lighter strings

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by EssJay, May 20, 2012.


  1. EssJay

    EssJay

    Dec 23, 2007
    Sydney, Australia
    I have decided that I'm going to go study music at a community college and I'm thinking it'll probably be a smart idea for me to have some strings lighter than my current set (50-70-95-115) so that it is easier for me to tune to E standard, thinking 50-70-85-105 gauge at the moment.

    My question: should I have both the bridge saddles (well, 2 of them) as well as the nut replaced? I'm thinking I'd kind of need to since I'm going down a bit on 2 of the strings and my thinking is that that much of a drop might cause problems with string buzz and I'd think maybe some intonation problem, but that's just a guess.
     
  2. 202dy

    202dy Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2006
    Given that the original work is correct, leave it alone. As long as the break angle is sufficient there should be no problems.
     
  3. EssJay

    EssJay

    Dec 23, 2007
    Sydney, Australia
    What do you mean by break angle? Me no ultra technical side of bass understandy lol
     
  4. Thomas Kievit

    Thomas Kievit Guest

    May 19, 2012
    Well your saddles won't give any problems if you get a lighter string gauge. There is an change though that you have to change the nut. Cause the dept of your nut where your string rest can be too much for the higher string gauge. Then they will lay too close at the fretboard. So by replacing it and letting it make less deeper cut out, your strings will automaticly lay further away from the fretboard, so you can play better and without buzz. Hopefully this helped you a bit :) Cheers!!
     
  5. EssJay

    EssJay

    Dec 23, 2007
    Sydney, Australia
    Thanks for that Music90. I'm going to take it to the shop today and see how it all goes.
     
  6. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Saddles are string-agnostic. Just install your choice of strings properly and you should be good.
     
  7. Duckwater

    Duckwater

    May 10, 2010
    USA, Washington
    In most cases 50-70-85-105 is really uneven tension, but sometimes your options are limited if you really like a certain string's tone. You can get the .112 balanced set from Circle K and they will have lower tension than your current set, as they are very flexible strings with a round core.
     
  8. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    you should be able to slap on normal size strings with no problem at the saddles or nut (i like .45-.105 myself).

    what might change is the neck relief, due to the decreased tension. a truss rod adjustment is likely all that you would need.
     
  9. 96tbird

    96tbird PLEASE STAND BY

    OK, this is just wrong.
     
  10. EssJay

    EssJay

    Dec 23, 2007
    Sydney, Australia
    Just got back from town, took ze bass in and the guy said that he doesn't think that a new nut will be needed, but if there is a need to change anything he'll give me a call to let me know and to give him permission to do it (I like this store, they actually tell you what they do and the instrument doesn't come back with all new problems like the last shop I took one to). Now it's just a matter of finding some way to pass the time for a few days until its back in my arms lol
     
  11. darkstorm

    darkstorm

    Oct 13, 2009
    Unlikely that a new nut will be needed. A regular 45, 65, 80, 105 set would make more sernse then the heavy 50, 70, 85 your thinking imo.
     
  12. EssJay

    EssJay

    Dec 23, 2007
    Sydney, Australia
    I'm going for strings that are a bit heavier 'cause I find them easier on my fingers, lighter ones shred my fingertips. I also like having slightly heavier in case I decide to tune down to drop d or d standard.
     
  13. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    Er, no and no.

    Heavier strings are higher tension, and thus shred the fingers more, not less.

    Also, if you change the entire tuning like that, chances are you'd need the neck adjusted again.
     
  14. EssJay

    EssJay

    Dec 23, 2007
    Sydney, Australia
    Yes, they are higher tension but I still find them a lot easier on my fingers than lighter ones. I think its because thinner strings to me feel like they dig in a lot more to my fretting fingers and hurt a lot and they just don't seem to be able to take the same kinda beating from the right hand.
    Also, the surface of thicker strings feels a lot smoother to me, but I'm not sure if there might be something GHS does to their strings to make them feel that way, no idea.

    I am aware, I don't have plans to keep it in D all the time after I get it set up in E, just dropping down when I feel the urge to break out into some low tuned sludge grooving or feel like playing blues.
     
  15. 202dy

    202dy Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2006
    Strings don't "dig in." Fingers do. You may have an urge to overplay lighter strings. Or not have the hand strength to bully the heavier gauges. Either way, it's not the string.

    The outer wrap on particular brand's model of strings is the same for all gauges. See above.

    Dropping for a song or two may or may not require a tweak. Days at a time will almost always call for it.
     

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