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Question for 2-Pup Stringray 5 & Sterling Owners

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Dr. Cheese, Mar 1, 2006.


  1. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Does the two pup SR5 and Sterling have the same coil splitting and series options as the single pup models? I have onl played a two pup SR5 briefly and did not figure that part out.
     
  2. ElBajista

    ElBajista

    Dec 13, 2005
    Sebring, FL
    The switch on the dual-pup Stingrays switches between 5 combinations of the 4 individual coils, but doesn't have any wiring-switching capabilities such as ser/par/sc.

    I don't know anything about the dual-pup Sterling.
     
  3. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Same deal.

    Thats an issue ive brought up once or twice over at the EBMM forum. Perhaps the Sterling 5 that wil lbe introducted this summer will have the wiring switching.
     
  4. ElBajista

    ElBajista

    Dec 13, 2005
    Sebring, FL
    I would assume that the dual-pup Sterlings will have the wiring-switching ability. Otherwise, what's the point of having the two different models, besides a slightly different neck and body, and the lack of the crescent control plate? Besides, it's called a Sterling, so it must have the "signature" sterling wiring capabilites.

    What I'm wondering is if they'll have a switch for each individual pickup, or an overall ser/par/SC switch. I would hope it would be the former, sort of like the Fendr Roscoe Beck sig.
     
  5. pickles

    pickles Supporting Member

    Mar 23, 2000
    Ventura, CA
    Series sounds like cack anyway :bag:

    I always leave single pickup rays in paralell, so I don't trip at all on the lack of that option.

    Dude, all I have to say is "Position 4". What a great tone to compliment the usual one.
     
  6. ElBajista

    ElBajista

    Dec 13, 2005
    Sebring, FL
    Really? Most Sterling reviews I've read have said that their favorite settings are Series and SC.

    I've played a few Sterlings, and I loved the Jazz-esque tone of the SC and the bigger, warmer tone of the series option. For me, the parallel wasn't too appealing, but that's just me. :D
     
  7. Smallequestrian

    Smallequestrian Rock and/or Roll Supporting Member

    Jul 6, 2004
    Chicago, IL
    Beta Tester: Source Audio
    Well, truth be told the different neck and body is the main reason why people choose Sterlings vs. Stingrays. I would bet 90% of the people who own a Sterling or SR5 wouldn't care if the wiring capabilities went missing. Most people, including myself leave in parallel.
     
  8. nad

    nad 60 Cycle Humdinger

    Sep 22, 2005
    I nearly always leave my Sterling in parallel, and every so often switch to single coil. Series just doesn't sound good.

    I prefer my Sterling over my Stingray for the neck, if the series option is not available on the dual pickup versions, I wouldn't miss it. Oh man, a Sterling neck with the tonal options of a Sabre. WHY DON'T I OWN ONE YET?!?! :D
     
  9. bdgotoh

    bdgotoh Supporting Member

    Aug 6, 2002
    Pacific NW
    My two pickup Sterling has the same switching system as the HH Stingray but sounds like a Sterling because it has the Sterling ceramic/steel pickups and the Sterling preamp. The HH Stingray has alnico pole pickups and the Stingray preamp. No series or single coil available on the HH basses, it's all parallel all the time. You need an HS bass if you want single coil...

    The HH basses don't really sound like a Sabre, I've liked Sabres a long time but I think the new basses sound better than a Sabre!
     
  10. nad

    nad 60 Cycle Humdinger

    Sep 22, 2005
    Cool, thanks for the information. It's not that I love the sound so much of the Sabre, just the ability of all that variety makes me dig them. Well that and they "hey, that doesn't look like a Stingray" vibe of course. ;)
     
  11. todd 4ta

    todd 4ta

    Apr 3, 2003
    Indiana
    Which Sabre are you talking about, the one with the 3 mini switches or the later one with the lever?

    I have three of the earlier Sabers (two '79s and an '80) and for me the 'phase' and 'brightness' switches are never used. The phase switch is commonly referred to as the 'tone suck' switch.

    That being said, I don't need the extra functions to make them sound great.

    I am also one that always used the parallel setting for the Sterlings and Stingray 5's that I've had. To me, the series setting on any pickup switch gives the initial impression that you have more bass or more volume, but I would rather use parallel and increase the volume level, the end result is better to my ears. Series is sort of like using a 'loudness' control on your stereo to boost the bass at a lower volume level.

    However, I have had times where I'm at full volume (on the bass) in parallel mode, and need to go to '11'. Switching to series will take me there if I need it. That's true on any bass with a series/parallel switch, not just Sterlings or SR5's. [I go into a DI with no level control, and then into my amp. I need to increase the level from the bass to the FOH, not just turn up my amp]
     
  12. nad

    nad 60 Cycle Humdinger

    Sep 22, 2005
    I've only ever played a Sabre with the lever, not the switches. Very cool bass, that might be mine because the dude who owns it owes me a substantial amount of cash, and is a jobless loser. That's for another discussion. :scowl:
     
  13. ElBajista

    ElBajista

    Dec 13, 2005
    Sebring, FL
    Oops, I'll call out my own mistake then. The problem is that I go crazy for wiring switches/setting/etc. and I assumed that most people would feel the same way.

    I know if I had to choose between a Stingray and a Sterling, I'd definitely go for the Sterling, but that of course is MHO. I found the Sterling capable of the usual parallel MM sound, plus the Jazzier SC sound, plus a pretty convincing old-school tone with the Series setting. How does that saying go? "We all march to a different drum?"

    It's like when we first heard of the Dual-pup 'Rays coming out, we all knew that most people would just keep it on the 3rd setting, all coils full. :D
     
  14. pickles

    pickles Supporting Member

    Mar 23, 2000
    Ventura, CA
    I think you may be confused about what switch position is what. Paralell is all the way back, single coil is in the middle, and series is forward. Paralell is the warmest and most natural setting to my ears. Series has more low end, but more gank in the highs. Single coil doesn't sound at all like a J bass to me, the placement of the coil is totally different.
     
  15. ElBajista

    ElBajista

    Dec 13, 2005
    Sebring, FL
    I think you may be right, in that I might have mixed up the extreme left and right settings. I'll see next chance I get to play a Sterling.

    I probably just momentarily caught a case of sidlexia...
     
  16. pickles

    pickles Supporting Member

    Mar 23, 2000
    Ventura, CA
    Turns out, for me, that postion 3 is a bit of a "candy" setting. Real sweet but where's the meat? The kind of sound thats great in a shop but gets lost in the mix. Positions 1 and 4 are my favorite (1 being all the way back) ... 5 is super cool but not useful as often, 2 and 3 are interesting and I'm sure I'll find uses for them. 3 is as close as the bass gets to a glossy, clear, smith style slap tone, but I prefer the slap tone of position 1 (thats why we play rays!!!). Don't get me wrong, its not a bad sound at all, but its not my go-to sound either.

    What I like on the dual pickup ray is having the real ray sound, and position 4 which is a little more classic sounding, a little more P-bass like ... so that on one bass I can cop most any cover tune that would come up with my cover band. In an original band I'd explore positions 2 and 5 more I bet.