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Question on steel neck reinforcing ala Warmoth

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by rdhbass, Mar 1, 2006.


  1. rdhbass

    rdhbass

    Jun 28, 2003
    Springfield, mo
    Hi. Im building a bass and will be on the neck soon and was wondering if any of you guys have used the steel bars for neck reinforcing. I was just wondering how you can put two steel bars, on their ends mind you, and you can stilll adjust the bass neck for relief. Wouldn't it just stay straight? i don't see how this works, please explain.
     
  2. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Any reinforcement you use, be it steel, carbon fiber composite, very stiff wood, etc., stiffens the neck. How stiff it becomes depends on the material and its shape and placement.

    Using any of these it is possible to make a neck so stiff that it not only doesn't bow in response to string load, it also can't have bow induced in it by a double-acting truss rod.

    Everything in moderation. I specifically remember someone having al all-ipe neck that could not be made anything but dead flat.
     
  3. rdhbass

    rdhbass

    Jun 28, 2003
    Springfield, mo
    only reason i asked is i was wondering if i should put neck reinforcement at all. I am just afraid of warpage and this is my first neck ever built. i will be using rock maple anyway and i am going to rip it into pieces and make a 3 piece neck. i may just skip putting reinforcement.
     
  4. rdhbass

    rdhbass

    Jun 28, 2003
    Springfield, mo
    thanks hambone for the advice. i've been coming to the luthiers forum for almost a year and a half, leeching valuable information when i can. Now I finally have dove in to building my first bass. I think I will donate to be a supporting member on this site. By the way I just cut out my body yesterday with a good old jigsaw, and my body thickness is 1 1/2 inches not 1 3/4. If it had been any thicker, my poor jigsaw wouldn't have made it through. I'm gonna shape the body and build my neck soon. My bass will be nothing as polished as the established luthiers on here with all those fancy woods but hey, its something I built from the ground up and if it proves to be successful, I can move on to better things.
    rdh
     
  5. I know some builders religiously believe that multi-piece necks are less prone to warpage. I don't argue the statements, but I had a warwick with a 4 piece shedua neck. The thing was warped pretty bad. I build my basses with 1 piece necks standard. Larry has always picked pretty good wood for me, I've yet to have a neck warp on me. That said, I built my first bass with a 5 piece neck out of ipe and jatoba stringers. The thing is so stiff that the truss rod was damaged when trying to adjust the neck. So stiff, that string tension hardly moved the thing. The ipe piece was decking stock, not particularly pretty, flat sawn and even had a couple of small knots on it. Stiff as Jimmy Hoffa!
     
  6. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    OK, you must be the one I was thinking of. Sorry it didn't work out well. BTW, how heavy was that neck?!
     
  7. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    That doesn't mean it's true.
     
  8. Frank Martin

    Frank Martin Bitten by the luthiery bug...

    Oct 8, 2001
    Budapest, Hungary, EU
    IMO/IME/The way I see it, a multi-piece neck, even if not stiffer, but will be more stable with less chance of bending in unwanted angles - and that is quite important

    I think I've seen a very old Fender here on TB that had an almost D-shaped neck: the G-string was off the FB around the 12-15th fret area... :eek:
     
  9. I've talked with Sheldon Dingwall about this. I believe that the only reason that he laminates his neck stock is that it makes for neck blanks that move in a more predictable manner. I don't think that he ever mentioned stiffness as a reason. I don't want to put words in his mouth, but I seem to recall him saying that he doesn't see any change in the stiffness of the necks between his 5-piece necks and the old 1 piece necks that the afterburners had.

    While I've seen people state that laminating makes the necks stiffer, I haven't seen any convincing argument as to why it would happen.
     
  10. Hookus

    Hookus

    Oct 2, 2005
    Austin, TX
    In fact, It seems to me that even dry wood glue is quite pliable, certainly more so than the wood itself.

    I can see an advantage in laminating necks in order to choose grain orientation, but again, it would seem to me this does not make them stiffer, just straighter do to non-parallel grain.