questions about the Peavey max 700 bass head

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by DirtySocks1379, May 18, 2005.

  1. Hello all. I am thinking about picking up a Peavey Max 700 head (guitar center has used but warranteed ones for $485). It is listed as being able to run in 8, 4 or 2 ohms. Does anyone know if it is a switch on the back of this amp that changes the ohms, or if you have to plug in another cab to the ohms down to 4 or 2. I am wondering because I have a 4 ohm ampeg cab and I was wondering if I could just plug this peavey in and be able to play at 4 ohms (I need the volume).

    also, what is the opinion on this amp? I have read good things about the durability and sound. I play mostly hard rock with a spector euro. Is this amp going to give me the aggressive, upfront tone needed for my style of music? I am buying it pretty much as a backup and an amp that I would use at home (I have an EBS TD650 at my band's rehearsal area).

    Thanks for your time.
  2. popinfresh


    Dec 23, 2004
    Melbourne, Aus
    From my understanding, all SS amps are just plug in and play (Correct me if i'm wrong).

    In either case. If it runs at 2,4,8 ohms, your going to be able to run at 4ohms, no matter what's on the back.
  3. yeah that's what I figured. I just remember that on my old ampeg B2 you had to have 2 cabs plugged in to switch the head to 4 ohms. I wanted to make sure the peavey was not the same way, because then my only solution would be to have two cables going to the same cab to drop the head down to 4 ohms, and I don't think this would work. Thanks for the quick reply.
  4. There are no ohm tap switches or anything on the back, its just plug and play

    Ive got the older version, the firebass 700, think its a great amp, solid as a rock, and a really good tone imho, i play into a 4ohm peavey cab and it sounds good

    think the power is something like
    2ohms - 700watts
    4ohms - 475watts
    8ohms - 275watts
  5. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Canuck Amateur

    You only need to switch taps for tube power sections, not solid state. Depending on the number and impedance of the cabs you use, the amp just "sees" a different load.
  6. Cool. that's the answer I was looking for. Thanks Hawkeye.
  7. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Canuck Amateur

    I think the Max700 is an excellent choice for a head that has both brutish power and reliability.

    I have a Deltabass and Nitrobass (now known as the Max160 and Max450) and these have been as reliable as stoves with a lot of tonal options to work with. The Max series of amps is definitely underrated.

    The Deltabass is for sale in the Classified section.
  8. one3rd


    Jul 10, 2002
    I have a Firebass (older version of the Max 700) and I really like it. My biggest complaint is that they've found a way to make the thing incredibly heavy.