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Rack Mounting

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Im a sock, Feb 5, 2003.


  1. Im a sock

    Im a sock

    Dec 23, 2002
    Central MA
    I didnt know which forum to put this thread in, so I used my best judgement.

    Can someone tell me how to put my gear in a rack? I know this sounds like a dumb question but I need to know. Thanks.
     
  2. PJR

    PJR

    Jun 20, 2001
    N.E. PA
    1st off.....the 'gear' has to be rack mountable....that is , have 'rack ears'.

    Once you determine that you have rack mountable gear.....simply place in the rack of your choice...and screw it in .

    What pc of gear is it you are looking to rack up ??

    PJR
     
  3. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
    And be sure you use the little nylon washers! Nothing looks worse than boogered rack ears/front panels...
     
  4. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    Small devices like some compressors (RNC, Nanocompressor, etc.) or effects like my Nanoverb can be attached to a rack shelf and then mounted in the rack.

    Since there are multi space shelves available, I suppose you could mount just about anything that will fit between the rails in a rack.

    What gear are you trying to mount?
     
  5. Suggestions:

    I've had the best results by racking this way:
    -use shallow depth racks if your gear will fit, standard depth if needed
    -remove front and rear covers from the rack
    -place the rack on the ground with the rear opening on the floor, the front opening pointing toward the ceiling
    -hold the (amp, effect, power conditioner, what-have-you) by the 'ears' with the faceplate aimed at the ceiling
    -slowly and carefully lower the device until the weight is supported by the rack rails
    -position amplifiers with at least 1/2 free space above and below (to aid cooling)
    -use the correct racking screws - they have a larger head and finer thread than average screws of that size

    Wee haa, we're done. Hope this helps.:)
     
  6. Im a sock

    Im a sock

    Dec 23, 2002
    Central MA
    What are rack rails? Do they come packaged with racks? because I dont have them and I think thats the problem. When I put my amp in the rack and screw it in, it looks like the rack will warp from the weight, which isnt much. What type of rack rails do i need or do i have them or ahhhhhh! help!:eek:
     
  7. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    The rack rails are the swiss cheese looking things that run vertically along both sides of the rack. The either have holes for snap-in nuts (like an SKB rack) or are tapped for screws.

    The rack rails are an integral part of the rack. The problem seems to be that your gear doesn't have rack ears or it would be pretty obvious what to do.

    You should mount the heavy gear in the bottom of the rack so that the bottom of the rack case caries part of the load. Some racks have rear rails too to help carry the load.

    What kind of amp (or other gear) are you trying to install in a rack?

    There are lots of good pix in the Show us your racks thread that was active a day or two ago.
     
  8. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    Most fan-cooled amps don't need extra space above or below.
     
  9. jondog

    jondog

    Mar 14, 2002
    NYC metro area
    Do you have an SKB X rack? Those are pretty cheap and I've seen them warp like you describe.
     
  10. PJR

    PJR

    Jun 20, 2001
    N.E. PA
    In fact...some amp manufacturers design their amps to have no space between them.....due to the 'forced' cooling design . (Take in air thru front vents....and force it out thru the sides, then rear of the amp-rack)

    PJR

    btw.....you still didn't tell us the components you are looking to rack up. :)

    PJR
     
  11. PJR

    PJR

    Jun 20, 2001
    N.E. PA
    Some examples :

    Here's the amp rack for my PA.
    Notice...I do have a single space between the amps, but fill with solid 1-space filler to help in the venting of the amps.

    [​IMG]

    PJR
     
  12. PJR

    PJR

    Jun 20, 2001
    N.E. PA
    Complete PA Rack.

    [​IMG]

    PJR
     
  13. I'll second that...
     
  14. Agreed... but if our friend is racking gear with side-chassis heat-sink 'cooling' (think Alesis RA-100 or similar) the space is a good idea.

    BTW - Some (maybe all) Eden bass heads draw from the rear and exhaust out the top of the enclosure. No gap on top - bad idea.

    Im A Sock...
    Does the amp you are racking have a cooling fan (if so, where is the inlet/outlet) or heatsinks (fins) on the side, on the rear, etc?
     
  15. SlavaF

    SlavaF

    Jul 31, 2002
    Edmonton AB

    Holy crap!:eek: That's some rack!
     
  16. Holy crap! is right! Macrotech's are about 50 lbs each.... watch your toes when rolling this rig around.:eek:
     
  17. SlavaF

    SlavaF

    Jul 31, 2002
    Edmonton AB
    Wow:eek: They're damn expensive, too.
     
  18. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    On the subject of racks, I've been told that a large percentage of amp repairs could have been avoided if more people would rack their gear into something that incorporated some material to absorb shock. Apparently these "floating" racks virtually eliminate and damage from bumps or knocks while the gear is in transit. Your thoughts?
     
  19. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    oh and another thing, my amp doesn't have a fan, but it's got a heatsink on either side. I'm thinking of incorporating a fan into my rack, more as a precaution than anything else. Am I better off having it blow air into the rack, or sucking hot air out of the rack?
     
  20. jobu3

    jobu3 Artist formerly known as Big Joe

    Feb 17, 2002
    Mountain Top, PA
    [​IMG]
    and petebass, a fan blowing in will cool better than blowing out (exhaust) but the air should have a palce to go (through a space in the rack or something) the down fall of this is that it will blow smoke and dust INTO your rack. a fan set up for exhast will be better for a rack that has every space filled and will keep airborne debris out a little better but it's heat dissipating capabilities would also be a little less...