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Rackmount Wireless

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by NioeZero, Dec 24, 2001.


  1. NioeZero

    NioeZero

    Sep 2, 2001
    Howdy, I'm comparison shopping for a rackmount wireless system.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. I am also in the market, so I am posting this just to get the updates, I don't want to post the exact question NioeZero just did. So I guess I am just a parasite on this thread, contributing nothing, waiting to reap the benefits of another's doings.:D

    look what I found...

    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?threadid=33733
     
  3. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    I use a Sennheiser Evolution 100 UHF system, and it works great.
    Other brands that make rackable units are Audio Technica, Samson, Shure, Nady, to name a few. Check out their websites for the full rundown on what they have to offer.
     
  4. brewer9

    brewer9

    Jul 5, 2000
    I use an Audio-Technica rackmount system. Its great!
     
  5. BassistJ

    BassistJ

    Mar 20, 2001
    Hemet, CA USA
    I use one of the newer Carvin rackmount wireless' and it works beautifully. And a damn nice price, too.
     
  6. Gman

    Gman

    Jan 4, 2000
    Indianapolis, IN
    GC is selling the AKG WR2000, 15 channel UHF, rackmountable for $199 thru January. I ordered one in today.

    Dave
     
  7. Pay close attention to the low frequency cutoff point. I tried my guitar players' Shure on my Roscoe Beck V, and it cut the nuts off the low end. I spoke with a Shure engineer, and he told me their Guitarist wireless is NOT acceptable for electric bass because of the cutoff. He said it was an FCC requirement, but I dug around the FCC site and was not able to confirm this.

    Other rigs like the NADY claim better low frequency response. Check one out with your ears first.
     
  8. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    That is good advice. My Sennheiser does not go down to 30 HZ on paper, but when I play it, I cannot tell the difference between the wireless and a cord. So my ears are telling me that it is not cutting off my bottom end.;)
    (oh, and no one else in the band can notice a difference, either, so it is not just my ears)
     
  9. hyperlitem

    hyperlitem Guest

    Jul 25, 2001
    Indianapolis, IN
    what is the frequency it needs to go down to, to be a good wireless bass system?
     
  10. SONICATTACK

    SONICATTACK

    Sep 26, 2001
    in the sun
    Ok I'm also in the market for an awesome wireless that can transmit low down freq., and doesn't break my bank account. IMO Don't even think about Nady or Carvin (if you have more money to blow) (F.Y.I Carvin wireless systems are made by Nady) anyway Bass guitar is one of the most frequency robbing instruments next to a keyboard, being that it's freq. range is from 20 HZ to about 10K HZ. From my experience with wireless systems, you will get what you pay for. Typically the more you pay, the better chances you have that you'll get a wireless that won't cut out without notice during a performance, make annoying crackles and buzzes when it changes channels, and you will be able to find a frequency that the local surrounding area's aren't already using. But what's confusing is that this rule doesn't seem to follow with frequency response. In my studies the Samson 32 sinth ($400) goes down to 50 Hz. The sennheiser Evolution ($500) goes down to 60 HZ. Shure UT's manual states that it goes down to 20 HZ, which would make me really happy, being that it's less expensive than the preceding companies. ($370) But I heard only a few comments on the Shure, some good some not. But both the Sennheiser and the Samson 32 I know never have problems transmitting without interference. My keyboardist uses the Sennheiser hand held, and I bought a lavalier Samson 32 for my church, both sound like their plugged in wired. :confused:


    So do I need to search with a higher price range in mind? The Sony sells for $800 :eek: and Shure makes more professional units that even break that.


    Again IM :confused:
     
  11. Phat Ham

    Phat Ham

    Feb 13, 2000
    DC
    What about the Sennheiser 5000 series?;)
     
  12. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    I use a Shure UT, and it's great. It goes down to 20 hz. A B string is 30.9 hz. Their VHF unit really blows, though.
     
  13. SONICATTACK

    SONICATTACK

    Sep 26, 2001
    in the sun
    Hey munji! have you had any problems with it???
    I guess I don't know what kind of venu's you play in. cause I don't want to have any problems when the time comes to go on tour, and everyone and their mother has a wireless. Can you switch the frequency's?
     
  14. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Nope, no problems at all. You can't change frequencies, so you'll need to be careful which frequency you get. We use a Shure UT wireless mic, and I made sure it was a different frequency. We also use two Audio-Technica wirelesses, but they're in a completely different band of UHF.

    At the $300 price range, it'll be tough to find a switchable UHF unit that has a satisfactory frequency range. In the $1,000 to $2,000 range, no sweat.
     
  15. Gman

    Gman

    Jan 4, 2000
    Indianapolis, IN
    I wish I could give a report on the AKG, but it hasn't come in yet. If they give me long enough to think about it, I'll probably decide that a cord will do.

    Dave
     
  16. i always wanted a wireless until i really sat and thought about it. I am an effects junky. I am practically attached to my board for 90% of the show and when i can leave for 5 seconds i have to run back to the pedals... a wireless would really not help me at all... :( boy would it be cool though ;) :rolleyes:
     
  17. My Nady Encore VHF does the trick, cheaper than dog p!ss, haven't had any problems apart from dropouts 'cause I had the squelch set to silly.
    Goes down to 20Hz, sounds good for live (I hate the noise gate but what can ya do?).
     
  18. SONICATTACK

    SONICATTACK

    Sep 26, 2001
    in the sun
    There has to be more companys out there that sell reliable wireless systems, that can go down to 20hz :mad:
     
  19. Unless you use a really strange tuning like a low G, of F, I dont see a need for that. Like mentioned above a low B string on a fiver goes down to 30.9 and usually when something is rated at 30hz it can truthfully go a bit lower than that.

    I use the Audio-Technica 1100 series. Retails for around $350, but its really worth it. I have never had any problem with interference and it has very good range. I believe it is rated at 30hz, but it might be 50hz, and I have never had any problems whatsoever with dropoff on any notes. The only problem I have had with it is it comes with about a three foot long cable, which is absolutely unnecessary. I am going to shorten it and solder a better end onto it. Every note sounds as clear as it would coming out of a 12 gauge speaker cable.;) So my recomendation is for the Audio-Technica 1100 series.