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Radio questions answered here (hopefully)...

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by thrash_jazz, Nov 6, 2002.


  1. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    Hi all,

    If any of you were wondering about how to deal with radio people I might be able to help. I worked in college radio for about four years. Admittedly, that's a little different from mainstream radio, but I developed a pretty good general understanding of how things work in the industry.

    sooo... any questions? :)
     
  2. srbguitar

    srbguitar Guest

    Jul 19, 2002
    Fremont CA
    question,
    what would be the best way to get your bands demo played on the radio? would calling the station and taking the song in work?
     
  3. SMASH

    SMASH Guest

    Jan 18, 2000
    Canada.
    It really depends on whether it is independent or corporate radio ... on whether they have specialty shows to play indie acts, etc.


    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=56778&highlight=radio


    The liklihood of you getting played also largely depends on if you're gigging and how much promo you do. If you've never been heard of and you've got no gigs or albums, nobody will likely play it ... and really why should they? Radio (& press) helps bands who help themselves.
     
  4. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    First of all, you really have to do your homework about the station. If it's a corporate station, be sure that your stuff fits in with what they play. If it's an indie station, find out the name of the show and/or DJ who spins your type of music. Believe me, this will go a long way.

    Music reviewers at radio stations have to go through literally HUNDREDS of CD's a day. They will generally listen to only a minute or two of the first three tracks. If something catches their ear they will check it out further, but otherwise, it's probably not going to get airplay.

    If you don't have a lot of press, forget about commercial radio, but good music will still be played on indie stations.

    Make your demo three songs. No more, no less. Bios and photos and stuff are good to have, too, but if it's a choice between spending the money on the demo or on the press pack, put it into the demo.

    As for calling the station, this is where sending your stuff to a specific person helps. The music director and his staff will likely be very busy and unlikely to remember a particular CD, but a specific DJ might, if your stuff really caught his ear. Be prepared and open to constructive criticism, as radio people are usually good at being brutally honest.

    Really though, I'd say the best way to get your stuff played on th radio is to a) write good music, and b) make sure you send it to the right places and people.
     
  5. slick519

    slick519

    Aug 11, 2001
    Salem, Or
    Why cant you have your radio on when you are talking on-air?

    Just Wundrin

    slicks
     
  6. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    It'll cause feedback. I'm not 100% sure, but I think the effect might be similar to that of plugging a mic into an amplifier and pointing the mic at the speaker.

    EEEEEEEEEEEUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUWWWWWWWWWWWWWUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!
     
  7. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    i've done college radio since 1985.

    interviewed Frank Zappa in 1987. he called in to my radio show.

    had other interviews/on air performances:

    Nels Cline
    Mike Watt
    Emily Hay
    James Grigsby
    Spain Rodriguez (ZAP Comix)
    Robert Williams (ZAP Comix)
    Victor Moscoso (ZAP Comix)


    i think a radio shift is a great way to develop public speaking.

    kind of a verbal vamping.

    fun stuff.

    f
     
  8. I think it's because there is a delay in the signal. Have you ever tried talking and listening to yourself at the same time? Nearly impossible.