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Raking back to the next string in aggressive fingerstyle?

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Tupac, Jan 24, 2012.


  1. Tupac

    Tupac

    May 5, 2011
    What is your opinion on it? I've noticed that Flea does this all the time when he plays. I even started doing it myself when I play, I hope it's not considered a bad habit. If you're climbing down strings, it's excellent because your finger is already primed and ready to rake down. I've noticed it produces an excellent sound too. It has KILLED my speed playing though.


    Here's a good video showcasing the technique. Notice how his finger bounces back against the E string every time he plucks, that's what I'm talking about.
     
  2. cewillm

    cewillm #1 Adam Clayton fan

    Jan 25, 2010
    Philadelphia, PA
    Perfectly fine. It's what you should be doing even if you are not playing aggressively.
     
  3. Jay2U

    Jay2U Not as bad as he lóòks

    Dec 7, 2010
    22 ft below sea level
  4. Tupac

    Tupac

    May 5, 2011
    Really? I presume you mean to mute the string? That's interesting. I just used the floating thumb instead. I'll have to experiment more if that's the case...
     
  5. Clef_de_fa

    Clef_de_fa Guest

    Dec 25, 2011
    It is how it should go no matter what you play !!! even when you use floating thumb ( which you should keep doing instead of muting with your thumb like the guy in the video )
     
  6. Tupac

    Tupac

    May 5, 2011
    Huh? He kept his thumb on the pickup throughout the video. You mean that's bad to do?


    Also, does anyone have a good lesson video showcasing this technique maybe?
     
  7. FretlessMainly

    FretlessMainly

    Nov 17, 2010
    The only bad things to do as a bass player are to:

    1. Injure yourself; and
    2. Sound like crap.

    Technique-wise, you don't have to use a floating thumb (I hate it and will never even try it again, but who cares?). OTOH, use it if it works for you.

    Personally, I find resting my thumb on a pickup to be a generally desireable thing. I need at least an inch or an inch and a half between my anchored thumb and the E string. The more distance the better. Floating thumb makes me feel like my right hand is in a straight jacket.

    But you may feel exactly the opposite, so find what works for you.
     
  8. Clef_de_fa

    Clef_de_fa Guest

    Dec 25, 2011
    Oups sorry I forgot to say his fretting hand's thumb. Putting it around the neck isn't a very good technic.
     
  9. FretlessMainly

    FretlessMainly

    Nov 17, 2010
    There are probably a few hundred professional bassists who would disagree.

    Now, it's not typically a normal fingering/fretting hand position, but I've done it off and on over 31+ years of playing.
     
  10. Tupac

    Tupac

    May 5, 2011
    Yeah. I see the pros do it ALL the time. It's mostly situation, depending on where the notes I'm playing are located. It's impossible to keep my form when doing neck spanning slides for example.
     
  11. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    When you're playing something fast with a lot of notes in a row, you'll be glad you practiced strict alternation if you did. Raking is OK on slower stuff with more space in between notes, but it can slow you way down when trying to play fast.
     
  12. FretlessMainly

    FretlessMainly

    Nov 17, 2010
    Once again I'm going to have to disagree with the broad application of that statement, Jimmy. I do just fine with a mixture of raking and alternating.

    One of the reasons I play this way is that strict alternating strikes me as leading to a rather sterile da da da da da da....feel to the music (it doesn't have to). For me raking naturally compliments my style which is heavily peppered with hammer-ons, pull-offs and slides, all of which add to the texture of the line.

    Sure, I can play a straight sixteen when the music calls for it, but I generally prefer a bit of lope in my stride, and less John Phillips Sousa in my line.
     
  13. sammyp

    sammyp

    Aug 20, 2010
    NB, Canada

    i've been raking sinse i started playing bass ....it just came naturally ....too naturally .....it messes me up on certain 16th note lines where i want my 1st finger to be on the down beat or start of a phrase ....
     
  14. sammyp

    sammyp

    Aug 20, 2010
    NB, Canada
  15. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Another good reason to get on a strict alternation program!
     
  16. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    LOL! Yeah, and knowing how to read music results in bad playing, too ;) Seriously, now!
     

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