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re-corking endpin socket

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by CPike, Oct 4, 2009.


  1. CPike

    CPike

    May 28, 2005
    Dallas, TX
    Has anyone ever replaced the cork lining in a Goetz endpin socket? Mine is getting a bit loose but I don't want to replace the entire assembly. Is there a simple method for doing this that someone here can explain?

    Chris
     
  2. Cody Sisk

    Cody Sisk

    Jan 26, 2009
    Lilburn, GA
    Ronald Sachs Violins
  3. I have re corked my end pin grommets rather than the hole! So easy I am still laughing about it, got some old cork I kept to remove rosin from my strings, sanded it into fine cork dust on a sheet of rough sand paper and in a bowl I mixed PVA (white wood glue) in with it, sanded the part of the grommet that goes in the hole a little and applied the wet cork paste onto it, used my fingers to work it in evenly than left it for 1 day to dry near my ducted heating outlet!!! Once it was dry I smeared more PVA to seal it and waited 2 more days for it to dry! After making careful measurements of the inner and outer diameter of the hole I just sanded the access cork off! Nice and smooth and even! You must leave a few micron extra to have it tight! Got the idea from a friend hwo re corked his fishing rods!!! Beautiful. That method will work either way I guess but on the grommet it makes more sense to me! Good luck!
     
  4. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    New Mexico. USA
    On the rare occasion that I re-bush an endpin, I use thick leather, which works better and lasts way longer than cork. The leather is cut out with a plug cutter, which makes a perfect circle. The end of the endpin plug may need to be drilled out with a matching Forstner bit (which makes a flat-bottomed hole). Then the leather piece is glued in, allowed to dry, then drilled to the right size for the endpin.
     
  5. CPike

    CPike

    May 28, 2005
    Dallas, TX
    Thanks for the input, I had forgotten I had made this request last year...

    @timobee4: I'm not quite sure what you mean by "grommets" - care to post a pic of your work to show what you did?
    @Mr. Schnitzer: I like the leather idea and will try it - what is the purpose of drilling the hole with the Forstner bit? Which end of the plug is drilled, inside or out?

    Chris
     
  6. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    New Mexico. USA
    The reason for drilling the hole is to clean out a perfect spot for the round leather plug. This is on the outside of the endpin unit, and it's not always necessary.
     
  7. As I said after carefully measuring the hole as it tapers in just make the paste out of old cork and PVA glue (white wood glue!)few days for drying and mor glue to seal it, dry it send it to match the measurements + a little extra and just screw it in!!! Both my double basses like that and they just brilliant and totally professional, no buzzing moving like a c**k in a sock I pulled the left one out of my bass to show you so thats obviously ready done, the other one is getting sanded in the middle of the process and I am making it for a friend!

     

    Attached Files:

  8. Cody Sisk

    Cody Sisk

    Jan 26, 2009
    Lilburn, GA
    Ronald Sachs Violins
    This is not what he meant. He's looking to cork around the shaft of the endpin itself, not the socket into the instrument. Wrapping cork around that part will severely dampen your sound IMO..
     
  9. CPike

    CPike

    May 28, 2005
    Dallas, TX
    Thanks, Cody. +1 on the damping.

    @timobee4, you might wanna reconsider this repair and have a pro fix it. The endpin plug and tailblock connection is kinda crucial and shouldn't have anything squishy impeding the contact.

    Chris
     
  10. It is not in any ways squishy! Hard as the wood itself! The cork was filed into dust and mixed with glue that hardens plus sealed with the same glue again to soak it in! When it dried it was so hard that it took me ages to send it!!!! I might be wrong but I can not hear any difference and the recordings I did with it are lovely! Rings for ages, all stings are even and my luthier had a look at it saying wow! the first thing he did was to try to dig his nail in it! Good luck I said! Its snug as a bug and hard and better than sandpaper that I see lot of people using! But thank for the advice! I will now have another one turned out of hardwood (ebony) and have a look at the wave difference! If you right a slab of beer on me when you come to Australia!!! If not it was worth experimenting! :cool:

     
  11. CPike

    CPike

    May 28, 2005
    Dallas, TX
    Wow... <shakes head in bewilderment> (hmm...where to start, where to start...)
    Naa, better just keep my trap shut...
     
  12. please speak your mind! I thought my message was the sweetest and friendliest and fairest and most appreciative reply I have ever sent to anyone as I greatly valued your opinion and input I thank you again for! For me sound is everything and you definitely had a point, so I'd like to know the reason for the "shakes head in bewilderment" please tell me as I am so open and willing to take in anything.

     
  13. Cody Sisk

    Cody Sisk

    Jan 26, 2009
    Lilburn, GA
    Ronald Sachs Violins
    +1

    I might try this myself as most of us value Arnold's opinion when he's generous enough to offer it..
     

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