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Reading = Fun!

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Suckbird, May 11, 2005.


  1. Suckbird

    Suckbird Banned

    May 4, 2004
    Sweden
    So i've been home from school for 2days(i'm sick) and didn't have much to do so i decided that i was going to learn how to read.
    I used that trainer on musictheory.com and a book and on this morning i think i can read pretty well, not that i can see a score and then play it perfectly.

    but what's up when people taking a lifetime deciding if they wanna learn reading? It's pretty easy? Like learning reading books... it's fun too..
     
  2. I think some people think it won't be useful (can you really evaluate the benefit without knowing how to read?), or that it's too hard or time consuming.
     
  3. Suckbird

    Suckbird Banned

    May 4, 2004
    Sweden
    i think it's great because i can see the rhythm too..

    Should i learn how to read the treble clef too?
     
  4. Vysous

    Vysous

    Mar 29, 2005
    I think that knowledge of Treble Clef can be useful, but it isnt neccessary.... Knowledge of Bass Clef is very useful for Bassist, because its most versatile and playing-confortable way how to read music.... Ability to Read +1
     
  5. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Why not? It can only help. It will give you access to a ton of other written music out there besides just the music written for bass instruments.
     
  6. burntgorilla

    burntgorilla

    Jan 24, 2005
    Belfast
    Jazz charts are written in treble a lot, or so it seems, to it couldn't hurt. I'm having more difficulty finding music that's in the bass clef. All I can find is bass guitar stuff, that includes tabs, which I don't want.
     
  7. pklima

    pklima

    May 2, 2003
    Kraków, Polska
    Reading treble clef is useful. It lets you practice jazz heads, opera arias etc. which has REALLY helped me play in a more musical way. The downside is that singers start asking you things like "hey, can you play that alto part so I know how it goes?"

    For bass clef music, Lemur Music has a HUGE selection of music for the double bass. Then there's music for cello, trombone, tuba etc. I've heard trombone etudes make for great bass exercises.
     
  8. Bass_Machine

    Bass_Machine

    Oct 29, 2004
    UK
    I've started to really get down to doing theory and reading music in my bass lessons and It seems to me, that now me and my techer have sooo much more fun in the lessons. I'm learnin treble clef too, just so I can do the sorta things you already said. I think music theory is the bee's knees and it makes me feel like a "real" bassist, instead of "some kid who plays bass", y'know what I mean?
     
  9. For somebody that can't read you sure can write pretty good. :)
     
  10. akuma12

    akuma12

    Aug 25, 2003
    Sarasota, FL
    Badump bump ;)

    Try picking up some classical string bass solos to practice your reading skills. If you have a 5 string you can get cello solos. Right now I'm learning the Bach Cello Suites. Not for a novice reader, but I've been reading music since I was 10. Definitely something to work up to though. Just wait till you run into Tenor clef. Now THAT's a bitch *grins*
     
  11. Suckbird

    Suckbird Banned

    May 4, 2004
    Sweden
    Err, am i supposed to read the alto/tenor clefs to?
     
  12. burntgorilla

    burntgorilla

    Jan 24, 2005
    Belfast
    I wouldn't bother, they're nearly obsolete.
     
  13. matrok

    matrok

    Jan 10, 2005
    Ferndale, Michigan
    OK, I'll admit I'm a bit slow. I can't seem to find that trainer you're referring to on the site. Where did you find it?
     
  14. matrok

    matrok

    Jan 10, 2005
    Ferndale, Michigan
    Nevermind, I found it on www.musictheory.net

    After playing 27 years, I've decided to learn to read. :eyebrow:
     
  15. Snarf

    Snarf

    Jan 23, 2005
    New York, NY
    Mmm, reading treble cleff is very useful as a jazz player. I'm kind of the leader of my combo, and to pick out tunes to play it's nice to be able to play the head so you know what the tune is going to sound like. I'm nowhere near as good as I'd like to be on treble cleff, I'm actually pretty awful with it, but I'm shedding it every day.
     
  16. akuma12

    akuma12

    Aug 25, 2003
    Sarasota, FL
    Oh yes don't worry about tenor/alto clef. It's usually only used in classical music when the range gets obscenely high. It's only something you'll want to learn if you run into it, other than that, don't bother :)
     
  17. burntgorilla

    burntgorilla

    Jan 24, 2005
    Belfast
    Isn't middle C on the bottom line for one of them, though? How does that help with higher ranges? Maybe I'm thinking off a different one...
     
  18. as a bassist i would only really worry about bass and treble clef. I have never seen any music for bass written in alto or tenor clefs but could be useful to learn if you want to read some cello or viola music.
     
  19. Tash

    Tash

    Feb 13, 2005
    Bel Air Maryland
    Learn alto and tenor if you plan on majoring in music at a college, or composing for orchestra/classical ensemble. Other than that they can be dispensed with.

    I failed an exam in sight singing because my teacher put all the examples on alto or tenor clef, that bast@rd!
     
  20. Its easy to identify the notes but for me deciphering complex rest arrangements are the tricky part.