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REAL Disco Anyone??!!!

Discussion in 'Recordings [BG]' started by Billy Low, Sep 6, 2008.


  1. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    Over the years I have found it a bit discerning that one of the subcatagories of American music that had been very instrumental in bearing the torch for groove oriented soundscapes has been scoffed, torched, and placed on the back burner of musical conversation. Although I can understand that one of my favorite genres of music suffered greatly from over-commercialization and over classification (many pop tunes that indeed were not disco were deemed as such [think ABBA]), I believe that the willingness to subject disco to the dungeon of the music library is a travesty. Many of the negative attitudes attached to the anti-disco movement was non based on just homophobic and/or racial indifference, but I believe it was because many people (rock fans) were afraid to be seen shakin' their groove thangs (or they were angry they lacked the coordination to do so).

    REAL disco music was an amalgamation of multiple layers of underground, non pop Americana. It was musical gumbo, if you will, with all of the flavors of the famed Louisiana treat. It based in soul, peppered with funk, had a dash of Afro-Caribean backbeat, a sprinkle of Latin spice, and a handful of spirit from the Black church.

    In my mind what happend to disco truley parallels what happened with funk, jazz, soul, and other great forms of urban music (to include Hip-Hop). As a bass player, I find it even more disturbing that some of the stankiest, grimmiest, slick, mack truck sized grooves ever go unheralded.

    Take a listen to some of these grooves (completely if you will):

    First Choice-Double Cross



    I could go on for hours posting even BETTER examples than these (I just may!). The grooves established on some of these songs fostered nothing less than a syncopated head nod and foot tap of the listener.

    I think that it's time that an honest dialogue begins in regards to Disco music. Sure, the clothes were funny, but the self expression had to be one of the greatest this side of Jazz.
     
  2. DWBass

    DWBass The Funkfather

    I used to be in a band with several members of Unlimited Touch. Not quite the best example of a great Disco song but at least they played live which, in my opinion, was the true highlight of disco music. When it became all computer generated sequences is when it began to die! A ton of musicians went unemployed because of it and the music suffered greatly!

    I have to say that the majority of the above songs weren't specifically written as 'disco' tunes but did get played in some clubs.
     
  3. John Wentzien

    John Wentzien

    Jun 25, 2007
    Elberta, AL
    Artist:TC Electronic RH450 bass system (original test-pilot)
    A lot of "Rock" players don't like it.....


    They can't Do it!

    Same with Blues..If you don't take the time to learn it, it "automaticly sucks" in their minds..
     
  4. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    My point exactly, most of the heavy hitting songs were featured in the clubs (discos) moreso than the radio, hence the term "disco" music. No, many of the artist were not attempting to play "disco" music that was the commercialized examples that still ring in most peoples head when the name is mentioned, but most of them did put out fine work that was intended on keeping the dance floor packed with booty shakers in the clubs. See the problem that lingers here!!!

    I do recall you stating before that you played with members of UT. I did not post what I considered to be some of the best examples because I wasn't sure the newcomer could digest some of the more underground music. Here's an example of a monster 70's soul group hittin' a hard disco groove...

    Black Ivory-Mainline
     
  5. John Wentzien

    John Wentzien

    Jun 25, 2007
    Elberta, AL
    Artist:TC Electronic RH450 bass system (original test-pilot)
    +1 great groovin' bass on that one.
     
  6. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    Check the groove.

    Jackson Sisters-I Believe in Miracles
     
  7. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    ;)

    There's more in store!!! Time for all of us to dig in the crates!!!

    (I feel my Afro groing back already)
     
  8. Scottgun

    Scottgun

    Jan 24, 2004
    South Carolina
    I don't know if you count Michael Jackson's Off the Wall as disco, but I really dig that one.
     
  9. mambo4

    mambo4

    Jun 9, 2006
    Dallas
    +10000

    whenI listen to the Bee Gees et al and consider that these cats pulled off that stuff live, I gotta give respect. Technically demanding and harmonically sophisticated compared to rock n roll, for sure.
     
  10. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    "Get On The Floor" was surely a monster club banger!


    That is, of course, featuring the right thumb of Louis Johnson..

    This was toward the end of the era.
     
  11. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    I find myself strangely internally divided on that one. Some of the hottest cuts featured some highly synthesized stuff. Think of the Georgio Morodor and Emuir Deodato stuff that was funky as ever. Here are some synth based cuts that are heaters.

    Machine-There But for the Grace of God Go I
     
  12. lowendgenerator

    lowendgenerator

    Mar 26, 2006
    CHI/NWI
    Great stuff BL! Thanks for the enlightenment.
     
  13. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    It beats rap.
     
  14. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    George Clinton let his ladies funk up the disco scene w/these cuts:

    Parlet-Pleasure Principle (please excuse the scratching at the start)
     
  15. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    Oddly enough, this was part of the origin of rap/hip hop! Many of the top rap songs of all time contain samples of some of the very songs I speak of. They even contain samples of some of the examples I've provided. Check my entry this thread on Hip-Hop:

    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showpost.php?p=4320589&postcount=227
     
  16. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    Linda Clifford-Don't Give it Up
     
  17. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    Four versions of this song, and THEY ALL KICK BOOTY!!!!!

    ALWAYS THERE performed by:

    Ronnie Laws (my favorite as an adult, the original recording-jazz funk for sure)
     
  18. DWBass

    DWBass The Funkfather

    That Willie Bobo version is killin'! Seems the most 'disco' like of all the versions. I also like Incognito's version but disco was long gone when theirs came out.
     
  19. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars
    Yeah, I forgot about Incognito's version. Alot of bands such as Incog, Jamiroquai, Everything But the Girl, The Brand New Heavies, The Rebirth owe alot of their sound to the unsung heroes of the disco era.

    That Willie Bobo version had more of the Afro-Caribe/Latin tinge to it with the dominant percussion taking root. He kills those timbales!
     
  20. Billy Low

    Billy Low

    Apr 14, 2003
    Chicago
    Sandberg Guitars

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