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Rebirth of the Badass! The new Omega Bridge

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by walterw, Aug 14, 2015.


  1. hintz

    hintz

    Jun 5, 2014
    wahiawa, HI(Oahu)
    Exactly my point as well....
     
  2. RED J

    RED J The ' Ol Dawg. Supporting Member

    Jan 23, 2000
    Tennessee
    Gentlemen may I offer a solution :
    antisieze.

    Or, just a drop of oil once in a while. Just like your car, things will freeze or seize if not lubricated when exposed to salt and moisture. Not a design flaw, more a neglect of routine maintenance.
     
  3. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Its the fact that its a very small carbon steel screw threaded into a very soft zinc saddle. The dissimilar metals will corrode much faster when they are in contact with each other than they would on their own. It can happen very quickly especially in this Houston climate. One sweaty gig, toss the bass in its case or gig bag, and the next day the adjustment screws stuck like chuck. It is compounded by the fact that they use tiny screws that are easily stripped so you can't really force them out. I have soaked them for days in WD40 to try and get them loose with no luck.
     
    David Jayne likes this.
  4. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    The proper word for it is Galvanic Corrosion.

    For Galvanic Corrosion to occur, three conditions must be met. There must be metal to metal contact, There must be a conductive liquid (sweat), and the metals must have sufficiently different properties. Zinc and Steel are a perfect combination for this to happen. The fact that the bridge is grounded in the circuit, and there is a very small electrical charge on the bridge speeds up the process.
     
  5. Dadagoboi

    Dadagoboi CATALDO BASSES Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 1, 2005
    Florida Swamp
    CataldoBasses: Designer/Builder ThunderBuckerPickups:Consultant
    001 is Allparts for nickel, 010 is chrome

    BadAss III strings both ways. I have a III, prefer the saddles on the BA IIs, one of which I bought used in 1982, has lived most of its life in the South (check my location), never lubed and has free moving height screws, never been lubed. That said, it would have been nice if they made the screws larger ...But they could be drilled and retapped larger if you G.A.S...


    BTW, Allparts is also selling saddle kits that will probably fit original BA II bases.
    4 Saddle Set for Omega Bass Bridge | Allparts.com

    Pricey, but not bad if you get the dealer discount.

     
    Pilgrim likes this.
  6. chicago_mike

    chicago_mike

    Oct 9, 2007
    Chicago - LA - Rome
    Endorsing Artist : Genz Benz
    Why not an aluminum BAII ?
     
  7. Helix

    Helix California U.S.A.

    May 29, 2015
    Aluminum = Soft / Steel = Strong
     
  8. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    I guarantee a machined aluminum BA would be much stronger than the pot metal they are made of. The real reason is the pressure cast, sintering process is cheaper and faster to manufacture than a machined aluminum bridge
     
  9. Helix

    Helix California U.S.A.

    May 29, 2015
    Agreed......do you think you'd still get the High Mass resonant from aluminium as you would from steel?
     
  10. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    Supposedly Leo quan in the early days actually made prototypes of the badass out of everything from brass to steel to wood, and found that the one particular zinc alloy sounded the best; he described the heavier, harder materials as having too much sustain in the high end, and the softer lighter stuff as not having the sustain overall.
     
  11. Because it wouldn't sound as good as the magic 'tone metal' BA used. : D
     
    Hopkins likes this.
  12. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    I honestly think the lighter the better, I think the tonal attributes of bridge mass are greatly overstated.
     
    Khronic, Dadagoboi and petrus61 like this.
  13. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    I've heard that as well, I mean I am sure cost had nothing at all to do with it. It just happens to be that using cheapo pot metal with the easiest, cheapest manufacturing process delivers the most amazing tone. :D
     
    Khronic likes this.
  14. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    What makes a great bridge in my opinion is a highly functional, well machined bridge, so that it is extremely adjustable and all the adjustment screws turn easily. I agree with Walter that the old school threaded saddle bridges were wonderful in their simplicity. Hipshot and Babicz make great bridges as well because of their function and build tolerances.
     
    Laurent likes this.
  15. jthisdell

    jthisdell

    Jun 12, 2014
    Roanoke, VA
    I put a Bad Ass II on my Fender P back in '83, have never had to adjust it
     
  16. Killed_by_Death

    Killed_by_Death Snaggletooth

    Jan 2, 2015
    heart of darkness
    The galvanic corrosion can occur w/o the presence of an electrolyte, but it does speed up the process significantly.
    I've seen stainless steel couplings welded into carbon steel piping when they didn't have the right parts. They corroded, even in a dry environment, but sea water really really sped it up.
     
  17. devnulljp

    devnulljp Supporting Member

    Oct 13, 2009
    BC, Canada
    Admin on the D*A*M Forum
    What kind of files do you use to notch the string grooves?
    I have a set of nut files but I doubt they'd be any use on metal.
    What sizes do you use? Something I can get at the hardware store or do I need to invest in something from Stewmac?
     
    Quantized Harmonic likes this.
  18. Killed_by_Death

    Killed_by_Death Snaggletooth

    Jan 2, 2015
    heart of darkness
    You can start the grooves with almost any small triangle shaped needle file, but should probably finish them with individual round or half-round needle files specific to each gauge.
    I'm sure someone will come along & correct me, or at least add more details.
     
    Goad likes this.
  19. chicago_mike

    chicago_mike

    Oct 9, 2007
    Chicago - LA - Rome
    Endorsing Artist : Genz Benz
    I've been contemplating getting a small milling machine to make pub's and properly route pedal enclosures....perhaps if I can make a good cad drawing of a BAII, I might try to mill one out of aluminum...for grins and giggles. :) More than likely I won't, but at least entertaining the thought, is...entertaining.
     
  20. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    All you need is one needle file, the square one. Once you determine your exact string spacing, you just cut a simple 90° V notch; it won't need to be very deep to solidly capture the string. (thanks @Bruce Johnson for that tip!)
     
    rmars likes this.