Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Recomendations on a Recorder?

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by TravellinMan, Jan 20, 2003.


  1. TravellinMan

    TravellinMan

    Jan 11, 2003
    NW Indiana
    I am look for a small resonable price on a recording machine! Where I can record myself while practicin' What do you recomend?
     
  2. Johnalex

    Johnalex

    Jul 20, 2001
    South Carolina
    Since you don't need anyhting special I would get a analog 4-track. Try Tascam or Fostex. I am pretty sure they make ones for under $100.
     
  3. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I've got a nice German wooden treble recorder - lower than the traditional school's descant and bigger. Nice tone!
     
  4. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Bruce...your a horrible person :D

    I recommend getting a smalle 4-6 track mixer....mackie and tascam are good to check out. then interface with your computer and use your computer to do that actual recording.

    but if you don't use computers much, or need more portability...I recommend this http://www.tascam.com/products/portastudios/porta02/index.php
    list price 225...you could probably find it for under 200 bucks.

    tascam is a good buy...but don't get data minidisc...no matter what! I made the mistake of getting a data minidisc mixer/recording unit....not only does no one use data minidisc so I can't sell it, but its expensive(20 bucks per disc!!) and it only records 60 minute or something like that...and it can't play back in audio minidisc players(you need a special player capable of both data and audio) though it is of higher quality than CDs...its not worth the head aches.
     
  5. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    LMAO, nice one...
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    It's entirely true! And is my honest first thought on reading : "Recomendations on a Recorder? " .... apart from "Spelling!!!" ;)
     
  7. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Minidiscs are not higher quality than CDs. They both use 16-bit data @ 44.1kHz, but minidiscs use lossy compression, which means the quality is lower (albeit marginally), like with MP3s.
     
  8. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Even in the Recording Gear & Equipment forum? :D
     
  9. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I just check the "new since last log-in",when I get the chance - never notice which forum!!
     
  10. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    OK it really depends on where you want to go with this. If all you want to do is hear your self play, any decent cassette recorder, including boomboxes with a mic input will do. Just get a mic, or a pre-amp with mic level output. This is OK for practice or to listen to yourself work through a lesson and it's cheap.

    If you want to record parts for practice or song writing then you need a multi-tracker. Cassette based units are plentiful in the used market for dirt cheap. Sound quality basically sucks but you can get an amazing amount of work done wth them. The musical sketch pad.

    If you want to wow your buds with look at what I did, then you want to go digital. The Tascam pocket studio is worth a look.

    My digital rig is based on the Tascam 788. Figure around a grand by the time you are recording and able to create CD's although the sky is the limit when you get into home recording.

    Serious computer based recording requires quite a lot of hardware and while you can do some of it on the cheap. It doesn't get really good until you've dropped some serious coin. Granted, it gets very, very good. But you're geting up in to Pro gear and Pro dollars when it does.

    Have at it!
     
  11. Define reasonable? What is your price limit? Will you ever need to record more than 1 or 2 tracks at a time, some recorders will let you record all tracks at once and some won't. Do you want hard disk or removable media (like a cassette)? Would you want the capability of producing an entire CD from one machine? (porta studio)
     
  12. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    The problem with a tape-based multitrack is that they get through tapes fast. For example, the little Tascam four track I've got will record at double speed on both sides of the track at once - therefore, a 60 minute cassette ends up only giving 15 minutes of recording time.

    That's more than enough for most songs... but if you want to record a complete practise session you'll be swapping tapes all the way through.

    I'm very happy with my minidisk recorder. I can get round about five hours on a single disk, mark and keep the bits I want and delete the rest, and record bits I particularly like to my PC for publishing to the web or distributing on CD. A simple tape recorder would also do the job, but random access makes MD a winner in my books.

    Wulf
     
  13. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    MD doesn't seem to have captured much market share at least over on this side of the pond.
    Are you concerned about MD as a long term format?

    The long format recording provided by MD, HD or DAT is a huge benefit though and the fact is that anything that doesn't cost more than a grand in this business has to be considered disposable I guess.
     
  14. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Yeah, I don't think minidisc recorders have taken of too well over here. I could be wrong. Yamaha used to do the MD4 and MD8 - but neither of those are still made. I don't hear about MD multitracks much. Not like HD ones, which are doing very well, I think. The Yamaha AW4416 for example, and the Roland VS2480 (Which I've just bought :)).

    If you're gonna be doing any editing - I suggest go digital. Editing on analog is... well... on cassette tape, non-existant! And on multitrack open reel tape, is still not ideal. Whereas editing on digital is so easy, quick, and non-destructive too.
     
  15. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    I'd like to see minidisk used more, not least so I can still be sure of getting supplies and being able to access my disks in five years time. Why else d'ya think I'm pushing it? :D

    Just in case it doesn't survive, I'm taking the precaution of backing up the things I want to the computer and thence to CD.

    I don't know about multitrack MD but a portable MD recorder and a decent mic make a brilliant portable recording solution. I guess the problem is that while it's brilliant for musicians, an MP3 player probably is a better solution for joe average who just wants to rip his CD collection (and his mates' collections) to a portable format :mad:

    Wulf
     
  16. rygelxvi

    rygelxvi

    Jan 6, 2003
    The Fostex MR-8. Check out the spec on the fostex web site. It's the least expensive easiest to use digital recorder out there. Go digital. IMHO tape recorder always break.
     
  17. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I agree that virtually every musician I know has a Mini Disc Recorder and they use it to analyse their performances and record advice and lessons at workshops.

    So I have been to Jazz Summerschool 5 years in a row now and the first year I went, I was the only person to have one - I recorded everything from the week and was besieged with requests for copies!! Last Summer though - virtually everybody had one and they were everywhere, recording everything that went on!! ;)

    I have noticed Jazz pros using them as well and a lot of the Jazz gigs I go to each week are recorded by the band members, using MD. I talked to a few and they mentioned how it is useful to check solos and see whether you are just repeating yourself and pulling out licks or are actually responding to the players and situation. Or they just want to hear how the band as a whole, sounds "out front"!
     
  18. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Looks like you started a trend there, Bruce :)
     
  19. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I was just first!! ;)

    I think it was just a happy coincidence - I was wandering along Tottenham Court Road when the first affordable MD's appeared that were small and recorded in decent quality.

    So I paid £120 for mine which seemed an incredible bargain at the time and even more so, now that I have used it for over 5 years to record stuff!!

    Actually my first attempts were pretty poor with the mic included - but I met a young and hip, pro Jazz sax player on the first Summer School who advised me to get a decent stereo mic. I bought a Sony one for about £80 and the standard of my recordings leapt exponentially!! So with the included mic - no bass at all on my recordings. With the Sony mic - fantastic bass response!! :)
     
  20. Ok. So I'm started to bug myself because I don't have any way of recording myself to see if one piece fits over another etc.
    As such, I'm currently looking to get some form of portable digital recorder so I can record myself and then start writing some more stuff from there.

    My laptop is too crappy to run any kind of recording software, I don't have a desktop, and I don't have a recordable MD player, nor am I really looking to get one.

    I was browsing through musiciansfriend.com to see what stuff they had, and came across the Fostex MR-8.

    So...does anyone else have any good experiences with it? And could I pick it up anywhere aside from ordering off mf since I've heard so much bad stuff about them?