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Recorded examples of standards

Discussion in 'Recordings [DB]' started by Howard K, Mar 30, 2004.


  1. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    I need a few examples of recordings to learn some standards...

    I'm after versions of Misty and Love For Sale, ideally I want versions that have drums, piano, bass and a instrument playing the melody, rather than vocals.

    Any ideas? :)

    thanks
    H
     
  2. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

  3. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    Yeah, allmusic is great, but it doenst tell me what the versions are like.. that's why I was asking on here, hopefully someone will be able to tell me which versions are possibley easiest to learn from?

    Is the Stan Getz version a genuine suggestion, or is it mind bendingly complex?!
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I think he's often dismissed for being too simple and melodic - creating a beautiful sound - that's why I thought he'd be a safe bet - or someone like Chet Baker, who was also noted for melody rather than complexity - I'm sure I've heard "Love for Sale" done by Chet Baker on trumpet as well, but can't remember the album....careful, you might get a vocal version though!! ;)
     
  5. Chet's got a great version of Love For Sale..Great bass figure. I dunno what record though...sorry.
     
  6. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    H & K - I would suggest reconsidering excluding vocal versions. Most of the time that I'm trying to take off a melody, i try to find a Billie Holiday version, barring that maybe a Frank Sinatra version because their reading of the melody of the tune is almost always the composer's iteration. Horn players like to embellish or at least start moving around the rhythmic phrasing. And I don't recommend learning a version of a version of a version. Start with the composer's intent, when you hear that well enough your ear will start suggesting things along the lines of what you have heard all of these other players doing (because theire ears suggested it).

    Whoever called Stan Getz "simple" must have done so in the abscence of actually listening to any recordings. Melodic, yes. Deeply so. Wonderfully so. Heartbreakingly beautifully so. Simply so, well no. Listen to LONG ISLAND SOUND or any of the quintet recordings with Jimmy Raney or hell even PEOPLE TIME. There's a lot going on there, if you can hear it.
     
  7. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Oh yes - some of the things I've heard are anything but simple - although the bossa nova stuff could be seen as simple melodies played fairly straight - although there is a lot going on in the solos.

    I think I've read reviews that say he makes even the impossible sound simple - that sort of thing - I only mentioned him as his was the first name I recognised, that came up on AllMusic as having recorded versions of these tunes!!

    I got this off an album cover :

    "His clarity of tone and ability to float effortlessly across the complex samba rhythms and often quite difficult chord progressions gives the music a drive and yet a sense of ease which a lesser performer would find difficult to achieve. Stan Getz had that quality of making the almost impossible seem simple, which is found in only the greatest of players."

    But really I only said that to "reassure" Howard that I wasn't winding him up by suggesting a version that was re-harmonised with Coltrane Changes or something like that !! ;)

    I genuinely thought this would be a good choice or as I also suggested, Chet Baker. :)
     
  8. tim99

    tim99 Supporting Member

    Jan 28, 2003
    You can download standards off the internet for band-in-a-box, and then assign the melody to any instrument you like. I like the "vibes" for the melody. You can then slow it down, or have it repeat, or remove the bass, etc.

    Maybe you know this and you are really looking for actual recordings...
     
  9. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    Well, vocal versions are great if there's a full band playing. I have a Billie Holiday version of Love For Sale, but it's just tinkling piano and vocals, so it's quite hard to follow from my perspective. Whereas when there are bass & drums playing I find it easier to hear and feel the changes (or, ahem, maybe to count and follow)

    I know what you mean tho, while learning the melody to Autumn Leaves, I found it much easier to remember when I could tie the melody to lyrics.

    Great bass figure... what like a big violin yeah? :D Sorry, couldnt help it! By the way, your record inspired me to learn the melody to Boplicity, such a fantastic song!

    OK, I'll check that out, Not worried about the record cause I'm going to download it, just this once.

    thanks chaps
     
  10. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    Ah, yes, indeed, very good point. That's gotta be a good way to learn - and in fact a good use of allmusic.com - to find out which was the original recording.

    Incedentally, I'm learning a few songs for an audition with a jazz band. I told them I'd not played jazz before, they were fine with that and commented that "a few bum notes wont go a miss, as long as you can swing". (Ed falls of chair!). So, well, here I go. I figured it was better to get out there and play, and take lessons and study at the same time, rather than sit in my basement playing along to CDs for the rest of my life.
    To the horror of real jazzers, I will be aiming to just get through the songs with as much variation as I can muster at this stage :rolleyes:

    The band has about 30 standards so far apparently, all pretty early stuff, which I'm pleased about since I wanted to start 'at the beginning' as it were.

    The tunes I'm working on are

    Yardbird Suite
    C Jam Blues
    Cherokee
    Take The A Train
    How High The Moon
    Love For Sale
    Misty
    Watermelon man (already knew that one)

    And there's a one more that has slipped my mind. All very cool, I'm really enjoying it so far, Yardbird suite is great, as is How High the Moon.
     
  11. What key do you do C jam blues in? Be careful of the melody on that one...it's a killer!
     
  12. basslife

    basslife

    Mar 23, 2004
    vegas
    Goes without saying about that "C Jam Blues." Guess I'll have to tip my hat to Elde Young on that one. 'C' is in that 256/512 zone, isn't it? Howard, yes siree! Keep your head up and your ears open. How about that tune, "Sioux City, Sioux?" Those free thinkers you're hangin' with ever get on into that chestnut? Howard, if you ever need a reference, John Handy can sing you the melody AND knows all the words!! He must be some kinda bad mamy poko! (You'd have to sneek on up to him and ask him aweful nice-like.) Wow, gotsta let out a notch on my belt again. Who turned the heat up?:)
     
  13. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    I dont want me no trouble mister
     
  14. basslife

    basslife

    Mar 23, 2004
    vegas
    Mr H, no trouble at all............what's this mister business, you can call me doc.:)
     
  15. Let me see here....I was joking about C Jam..I know who ElDee Young is...I don't know what" C is in that 256/512 zone" means. I know Sioux City Sue...but, what does the "free thinkers" sentence mean? I have no idea what the rest of your post means...Can you explain? bad mamy poko?
     
  16. oliebrice

    oliebrice

    Apr 7, 2003
    London, UK
    The band has about 30 standards so far apparently, all pretty early stuff,

    Watermelon man (already knew that one)


    even if all those bebop tunes count as early, Watermelon Man doesn't!
     
  17. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.

    Sorry, I've played it on enough clubdates, it's a standard.

    Vis a vis early, ya gotta understand, these guys have been involved in music that didn't come into the public consciousness until the late 50s/early 60s, so something written in '46 is "early".
    Pres is practically neolithic, and memory merely whispers the name of Buddy Bolden.
     
  18. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    I know it doesnt, it just didnt seem worth highlighting.

    I'm counting anything sort of pre-1950 as early really - is that way off? I kind of lump anything that sounds like the soundtrack to an old gangster movie, or something crackley that my dad listens to, together. I speed read sterns history of jazz, some of it sunk in, some of it didnt :)

    I thought Charlie Parker was a forerunner to bop? His music sounds only a step away from big band swing to me (me and my untrained ears!)
     
  19. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Charlie Parker is by a lot of people considered the quintessential bebop musician. When talking about the bebop-era most people will agree it started when Bird came unto the scene bigtime in the 40s.

    His music was a development of swing and bigband. I know he was influenced by Louis Armstrong ,Lester Young, Art Tatum amongst many others. Typical aspects of his music are that tunes are often played at a fast tempo, the melodies are usually quite intricate, both melodically and harmonically, however they are often based around standard tunes (like Rhythm Changes). The solos are more harmonically and rhythmically advanced that swing and pre-swing era solos.

    A few other bebop musicians of note are Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonius Monk, Bud Powell etc.

    /lovebown
     
  20. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    aah, right, thanks. I thought of bebop as being more like modern jazz, less 'dancey' if you know what i mean.