Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

recording methods

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by SkaKing27, Jul 15, 2003.


  1. SkaKing27

    SkaKing27

    Sep 1, 2002
    St.Louis MO
    Well,my band is going to record for the first time near the end of this summer.And I was wondering,would it be better to record us all at once,or tracking each instrument,give me some pros/cons,etc....i know that it would probably be easier to mix with the tracking method,but I'd still like to hear your thoughts,thanks.
     
  2. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    It depends on what they're using to record you on. I usually track all rhythm instruments at once, bass, drums, guitar, then I add one by one, the vocals, solos and aux. stuff. Find out what the studio has. Most likely the engineer(s) will have a way that they prefer and you'll just do what they tell you.
     
  3. SkaKing27

    SkaKing27

    Sep 1, 2002
    St.Louis MO
  4. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    I'd say go digital. Their digital equipment is far better than their analog equip. Plus I've had a lot of experience with ProTools and you can do some really cool things with it. Good luck and let us know how it goes!
     
  5. SkaKing27

    SkaKing27

    Sep 1, 2002
    St.Louis MO
    yeah.will do.thanks a lot.once we record we will get some mp3s up or something.
     
  6. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    Nice, I'd like to hear those. My band is actually in the studio now as well. So I know how you feel. The difference is I own my own studio so I can record however I want whenever, it's a big plus, if you have any questions or anything at any time, PM me. I'm sure I can help you out.
     
  7. Ben Mishler

    Ben Mishler

    Jan 22, 2003
    San Jose
    I would defintley record everyone at once, as it will end up making the whole process go quicker, which is usually a plus. My band is in the the process of recording our second demo right now. With the first one we did it individually, as the mixer wasn't big enough to allow us to do more than that. But now we have borrowed a bigger mixer, and we are doing everyone at once. The first one took almost two weeks to do, so far with this new one we have done six tracks in two days. Just my $.02.
     
  8. Nails

    Nails

    Jun 4, 2000
    Austin, Tejas
    Here's how I'd do it, this is with unlimited studio time though:

    Scratch vocal and rhythm guitar tracks, played to a click if the band wants
    Track Bass and Drums together
    Track Guitar, rhythm first then leads
    Track Vocals, after getting lead vocal (either by comping or punching in if needed) do backup vocals.
    Add extras, synths, strings, pianos. All the cool stuff that you don't really need but it adds to the sound.

    For those on a budget, do it all at once and rerecord what needs to be rerecorded later.
     
  9. Jontom

    Jontom

    Mar 11, 2002
    New York
    Having the drummer play to a click is an absolute must. I don't care if your Vinnie f$%&*(# Coliuta...put on "the cans"! Its so much less work in the end. Try to get two tracks for yourself- one direct and a mic on your amp and mix the two to taste.;)
     
  10. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    Be careful with the click track though. Don't force your drummer to use it. Some really great drummers cannot play to a click track no matter what. Sometimes it will make the recording worse.
     
  11. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    You have to practice doing that <b>before</b> you record. When your drummer does it the first time in the studio, you're in trouble.
     
  12. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    When we recorded our demo we went digital and every instrument was isolated and we tracked all at once. That way we were able to do it quickly and not have any bleed over from instrument to instrument. We also wanted a sort of live performance feeling to it. As far as my bass goes, we split the signal with a mic on the cab and a direct line to the board. We later mixed them together.
     
  13. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    Even still, like I said, I own a studio so I've seen many many bands record. And some drummers just can't do it, even with practice. It doesn't make them a bad drummer, the click just messes them up. I'd certainly say have your drummer practice with a click and if he can do it, definitely record with a click, it's the only way to know you're right on beat.
     
  14. fastplant

    fastplant

    Sep 26, 2002
    Connecticut
    That's probably the best way to record if you're trying to get in and out quick. You get a good live feeling and it doesn't take weeks to record. However, many small studios don't have enough isolation booths to do this properly.

    How did the bass end up sounding. I usually record the bass in the same way, but I know other engineers who have trouble and end up only using one of the signals.
     
  15. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    It was the first time I was ever in a studio so I really didn't know how to get what I wanted. I discribed the quality of tone I wanted to the engineer and he came very close. But I wanted alittle more growl. Overall though it came out very good. We have some MP3's here
    http://www.roadhouse5.com/
    and let me know what you think.