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Recording Oneself in Practice

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by Johnny L, Sep 16, 2003.


  1. Johnny L

    Johnny L

    Feb 14, 2002
    Victoria, TX
    I hate recording myself for any reason...it spoils the fantasy. But I'm back to doing it again anyway and facing the music, or at least truth, in all its glory.

    Does anyone else do this as part of their practice routine, or am I the only one who secretly gets excited over reliving my mistakes without having to actually do them exactly the same way again? If you've responded with an enthusiastic yes, what advantages has it brough to you other than not getting to fool yourself quite so easily anymore?
     
  2. I think recording yourself in practice is a great idea. Unfortunately, I can't stand to do it because to me, my playing always, always sounds like crap. So it ends up being more frustrating than helpful.
     
  3. Johnny L

    Johnny L

    Feb 14, 2002
    Victoria, TX
    Yeah, I'm super critical of my playing on tape too. I'm trying to change my attitude and have faith that taking the time to review what I've recorded will boost me up the learning curve a little more efficiently.
     
  4. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    When you listen back, you're not doing it for pleasure ;)

    It allows you to concentrate on the sound produced (which is what you're aiming at improving) without getting distracted by the physical issues of playing the bass and the mental concentration on hitting the right notes at the right time :D

    Critique what you hear, to pick out what sounds good and also to spot inconsistencies (eg. if you spot timing glitches when you shift positions or intonation errors when using a particular fingering) that can then be improved with specific exercises.

    Wulf
     
  5. Johnny L

    Johnny L

    Feb 14, 2002
    Victoria, TX
    Right...for the challenge to improve, baby.
     
  6. I don't record myself religiously but I know I should. When I do, it improves my technique and feel tremendously. It's really depressing when I go into the studio with a band and listen to my playing and hear all my "mistakes" I didn't hear when I was playing. The main thing I listen for when I've recorded myself is feel and not just mistakes. Most of the time I know when I've flubbed a note or dragged or rushed but it's harder for me to listen to the feel when I play because sometimes I'm concentrating too much on the notes. My main goal is to make it feel good even when I hit a wrong note. Tape does not lie when it comes to feel.

    Just gotta keep listening.