1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Recovery for University Audition

Discussion in 'Orchestral Auditions [DB]' started by Tyler L, Dec 5, 2018.


  1. Tyler L

    Tyler L

    Aug 16, 2017
    Urbana, OH
    Hey everyone, so I am getting trigger finger surgery for my pinky next Wednesday. Doc said it's not a big deal (minus my current pain, the worst is past) and I'm really not super worried about the procedure itself. I have an audition for public university orchestra in mid-January. I have most of my material down (still needs "perfecting", especially the solo) and the doctor reports that he would like to see me start back on double bass within 24 hours of surgery, which seems promising. He said it could be a few weeks before the pain and discomfort are completely gone, but admits he's not familiar with playing double bass. I demonstrated a few things in the office and he saw no problem. As with most surgeries, I'm assuming some strength may need regained and perhaps some set-backs along the way. The stitches are scheduled to come out on December 21st. My prepared pieces are the recitative from Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 and the Bach Cello Suite No. 3 Bourees. It's a pretty relaxed audition so if I need to reschedule, I probably can. At the same time I'm trying to save face and honor the date, if possible. I've seen mixed reports on the BG side, but wanted to hear from some DB people on the matter. Thanks everyone!
     
  2. ILIA

    ILIA

    Jan 27, 2006
    Save face and honor the date? If you are sick, there is no dis-honor, disrespect, nor humiliation, for canceling an audition. That's why scared and/or unprepared healthy musicians "call in sick" to an audition, even when they are not sick. It's the best excuse in the business. However, it doesn't work in the reverse, meaning, showing up sick to an audition no matter what, confers no additional honor nor respect.
     
    Tyler L likes this.
  3. wathaet

    wathaet

    May 27, 2007
    I would skip or reschedule. It is also not a good idea to force things when you have injuries. Cancel the audition and focus on basics, identify what caused the issue in the first place.
     
    HateyMcAmp, Tyler L and the_Ryan like this.
  4. salcott

    salcott Supporting Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    NYC, Inwood.
    I'd be looking for a different doctor. I can't imagine any hand surgeon who knows anything at all about musicians' hand issues advising someone to try playing within 24 hours of the procedure. I wouldn't schedule an audition for less than two months after the stitches come out. When I needed carpal tunnel release, I got my teacher to ask her colleagues for recommendations and went with the one most players had used or knew of. The stitches came out ten days later, and I started PT immediately. It was four weeks after that before I could even think about playing. Please get a second opinion if you can.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018
    HateyMcAmp, Tyler L and the_Ryan like this.
  5. the_Ryan

    the_Ryan

    Jul 10, 2015
    Ithaca/Seattle
    I agree with what others have said.

    You don’t get any points for playing through pain and rushing to play after a medical procedure; playing will generally make things worse if you are injured and/or recovering.
     
    Tyler L likes this.
  6. Tyler L

    Tyler L

    Aug 16, 2017
    Urbana, OH
    Good stuff. Thank you all. I'll follow suit and postpone my audition. I'll probably wait to call until a little closer to the date just to see how it heals. I feel less like a loser knowing that postponing is more common than I thought. As you all said, better to postpone than to choke at the audition. Also, by saving face, I guess I just didn't want it to spread around my community that I had an injury. Worried that stigma may follow me in the future should I choose to audition elsewhere.

    This is actually the third doctor in the area I've went to. I live in rural Ohio so admittedly not many choices, but this guy seems good. He didn't want to do surgery until I first tried alternative methods. If I hadn't hit my deductible already this year, I'd hold off on it until summer. Also, I've talked with my instructor and he told me he doesn't really know any bassists who have had to go to an Ortho with issues in Ohio.

    Also, for clarification and so nobody worries that I'll further injure myself by being a complete dope, he didn't mean that everything would be ready for performing, just that I needed to play on the bass (I assume he meant like warm ups and scales) within 24 hours to prevent scar tissue from forming and allow for movement. He did specifically say no heavy gripping and let pain be your guide. I shouldn't be gripping with my left hand anyways so I'm remaining hopeful there. I apologize for not being specific. I've been through 3 cortisone shots at this point and it's been almost a year since onset so I'm ready for some long term relief!
     
    Reiska likes this.
  7. salcott

    salcott Supporting Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    NYC, Inwood.
    Your community doesn’t care if you’ve had an injury. They care if you can play.
     
  8. salcott

    salcott Supporting Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    NYC, Inwood.
    If three cortisone shots haven't worked, no amount of rest or PT is going to alleviate the problem. Find a surgeon who specializes in dealing with athletes, musicians, and others who make a living with their hands. When I went to my doctor for the first time, I noticed pics on the walls of Knicks, Mets, players of many instruments who were familiar to me, etc. Go on the websites for Cleveland, Cincinnati, Columbus symphonies, look at the bass sections, write anyone who has an email address in their bio, and tell them your situation. I'd be surprised if no one responds.
     
  9. BobKay

    BobKay Supporting Member

    Nov 5, 2012
    Estero, Florida; USA
    You could also check doctors in Columbus, perhaps at OSU. You are only 50 miles away. Find the absolutely most experienced person to do the work.
     
    salcott likes this.
  10. salcott

    salcott Supporting Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    NYC, Inwood.
    When I was in the process of getting my carpal tunnel diagnosis, the first doctor I was referred to admitted he knew nothing about music (I had to show him a picture of me playing , with closeups of LH to explain what I do) or any aspect of playing a musical instrument. I thanked him for his time, and said I'd prefer to deal with someone who had more experience working with musicians. He didn't seem to be bothered, and I got the hell out of there. You want recommendations from musicians, period.
     

Share This Page