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Refinish project

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Rick Martin, Mar 11, 2001.


  1. I have the urge to refinish a bass. Where can I go on the web to learn about that?
     
  2. davelowell

    davelowell

    Jan 18, 2001
    stl, mo
  3. eric atkinson

    eric atkinson "Is our children learning "Is our teachers teachin

    Feb 4, 2001
    Joplin,Missouri
    I sure hope you like sand paper! That finish is about a quater inch thick and hard as hell!
     
  4. Thanks for the web site clue Dave. "EVERY THING you need to refinish a bass!" (like Ed
    McMahon). "Wrong, laquer breath!" (like Johnny).
    I realize the finish is vey tuff to get off, but I wanna do it. I need a project like this to keep me out of trouble.
     
  5. eric atkinson

    eric atkinson "Is our children learning "Is our teachers teachin

    Feb 4, 2001
    Joplin,Missouri
    We used to do this for fun and found alot of neet ways of doing it! Did you know you can get it down to the wood then used food color to dye the wood the poly it! Makes for some very strange looks!
     
  6. Rick, if you'll get the poly finish started with a sharp knife (say somewhere near the pups or neck pocket), you can use a heat gun or hair dryer to soften the finish and peel of larger chunks of finish without the need for sandpaper.

    Please avoid eric's suggestion of food color for dying the wood of a bass. Food color isn't lightfast and will fade, even if put under a hundred coats of clear finish. There are several makes of dye that are suitable for this type of finish. You can find some at:

    www.stewmac.com

    These will provide deep rich colors that won't fade with time and light exposure. They will also give a rich, deep tint that will be perfect for clear finishes.
     
  7. Thanks again Mr. Bone. I like that heat and peel approach. I intend to use professional geetar finish products like those from stewmac. I'm even gonna read the 'structions first.
     
  8. eric atkinson

    eric atkinson "Is our children learning "Is our teachers teachin

    Feb 4, 2001
    Joplin,Missouri
    I dont know my food coloerd bass has looked great for about 15 years now!
     
  9. Eric, I can't argue your specific results. But to make a food coloring lightfast would require adding several components to it's formula. This wouldn't make it something you would want to eat! Your results are likely based on the color selected and not the coloring itself.

    Of course there's nothing wrong with that!...:)

    It's just that, with some of the special die systems available to hobbyists today, any desired shade could be mixed with some guarantee of spot on color and a reasonable certainty that it wouldn't fade in years to come
     
  10. eric atkinson

    eric atkinson "Is our children learning "Is our teachers teachin

    Feb 4, 2001
    Joplin,Missouri
    Ya ive been in the antique refinishing buisness for years now! I wanted a strawberry color so i took the red and the green and several hours and finally got it! The reason i used food color is i wanted a antique look to it! I will try to find a pic of it later!
     
  11. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    I build custom furniture and have been using food coloring for years as a stain. I use Easter egg dye which is the same thing as regular food color but is a stronger solution.

    I have never even considered the fade factor. I've never had a problem with fading and I'm looking at a coffee table, as I type, with a food color stain on it that's over fifteen years old and it shows no sign of fading. I use a water based poly clearcoat which usually contains a UV resistant component. The first coat will disolve the dye and tint the clear topcoat so I put the first coat on thin and let it set up good, then follow with as many coats of poly as needed.

    Another big advantage in food color is that if the results aren't satisfactory, you can spritz the surface with a clorox/water mix and bleach the color back out very easily. Before the first topcoat, of course.

    Try it on a scrap, Hambone, you might be surprised at how well it works.

    Pkr2
     
  12. eric atkinson

    eric atkinson "Is our children learning "Is our teachers teachin

    Feb 4, 2001
    Joplin,Missouri
    Food color just has such a strange look to it! Its kinda old looking! Very neet!