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Regular pots vs. mini

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Gintaras, Sep 24, 2005.


  1. Gintaras

    Gintaras Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 2004
    Kent Island, Md.
    I went to replace my pu's and pots on a squier precision 5. I did not realize that the pots were minis and I had the larger size. I read on a thread that mentioned to get rid of the mini's on a squier and put on the larger pots. I do have the pots and only need a few minutes in my shop to make them fit. Should I do this? Also why does the ground on the tone have a resistor? Schematic has it labeled as '683'. I have installed Bartolini 59's and they sound great.
     
  2. tadawson

    tadawson

    Aug 24, 2005
    Lewisville, TX
  3. Gintaras

    Gintaras Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 2004
    Kent Island, Md.
    Did not know that it was a capacitor. I do have the schematic and that is where I saw the ID number on the part that I thought was a resistor.
    Do I need to keep the capacitor with the new pots? Can you tell me how it affects the tone? After reading further into the threads last nite, I found enough info that I ordered a set of CGE mini pots.

    Thanks...talkbass has been a great resource for this midlife newbie. In my previous bass life I was moving the needle on a 33 1/3 LP to hear the bass part. :D
     
  4. tadawson

    tadawson

    Aug 24, 2005
    Lewisville, TX
    Without the cap, you won't have a tone control - that is THE key component to the tone circuit! So, yes, you WILL need a cap with the new pot(s) . . . . .

    - Tim
     
  5. Gintaras

    Gintaras Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 2004
    Kent Island, Md.
    Still in learning mode!!! Is the number that is on the schematic '683' some type of value and does that number have any affect on how the tone pot works?
     
  6. Lyle Caldwell

    Lyle Caldwell

    Sep 7, 2004
    Memphis
    Do a search on "tone capacitor" and reams of information await you.
     
  7. tadawson

    tadawson

    Aug 24, 2005
    Lewisville, TX
    The "683" is a code for the value of the part, and the value determines the frequency range of the tone control, more or less. As Lyle said - do a search - there is a lot of good information out there.

    - Tim
     
  8. Jimmy P.

    Jimmy P.

    Apr 5, 2005
    Tokyo, Japan
    To the original poster (Gintaras) - you don't necessarily have to use the specified capacitor; there is nothing wrong with experimenting. For example, you can buy a selection of several capacitance values (they aren't expensive) and try each one in a temporary trial. With your bass disassembled, use alligator clips to hold the capacitor in place until you find the tone you like.