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Rehearsal amplification

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by tresdirnt, Feb 15, 2002.


  1. I know many people have nice setups, powerful amps and huge speakers etc. But do you use them for practices? And if you don't, what do you use? I was thinking that my 125 watt was over the top for practice and that I could get something smaller for practice, then invest in a nice setup for performance. Please note the other members of my band are quite reasonable and would turn down at practice if I asked (please don't hurt me).
     
  2. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    One thing that has always worked for my bands - the lower the volume you practice at, (within reason), the more the flubs stand out and enable you to correct them. Too much volume masks mistakes that can come back to bite you in the ass when you're onstage.

    Plus, recording practices and rehearsals for playbacks is invaluable.....as long as everyone has the attitude that mistakes are okay because that's a big reason why you're having the rehearsal/practice.

    With one band, I just use a 15" that probably isn't getting any more than 40W. With another band just a 2x10 that probably isn't getting any more than 100W, even though the head is capable of much more (300W unbridged).
     
  3. bizzaro

    bizzaro

    Aug 21, 2000
    Vermont
    I am screwed! The band I am in is just as loud at practice as when we will play out. The lead guitarist has damaged hearing because of years of this(but has great ears for tone), and the drummer is a whacker(can you say Max Weinburg)!!!!! Both these guys are pretty talented inspite of this. I am at odds with this, but my only option would be to leave the band. I am not ready to say turn down or I am out of here. I am pretty new to all this and need the experience. I think Rick is right on and it helps your playing as a band and individually when you can hear what is goin on with everybody. I say turn it down and hear what you are missing. I have two cabs so I leave one where we practice and haul my amp back and forth. My practice amp would never cut it.:(
     
  4. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    Believe it or not, for most rehearsals I just use whatever amp is in the room.

    In most bands I've been in there was someone who had a space with beater gear for others to use (I keep a beater guitar amp, beater drum kit and small PA in my own basement). In a few bands, there was a rehearsal space but no bass amp so I'd just bring over my own beater and leave it there. I even know a jazz pianist who keeps a string bass at his apartment to give guys more incentive to come over to jam :cool:

    I'm so used to this after 25 years of playing, I always figured this was how most bands did it.

    I suppose some players might be picky about getting "their tone" on a beater amp but I've never found it to be a problem, I can a usable sound out of almost anything.
     
  5. (desperately tries not to sound nieve)
    What is a beater amp?
     
  6. My gig set up is a pain in the ass to haul to practice, especially since we practice in our drummer's basement and you have to go down a steep, narrow set of stairs to get there. The other problem is we typically only practice once before we're off to do the next show so I would have to haul my stuff down to practice and then haul it all back up once we're done.

    I decided it was a worthy investment to buy an amp exclusively for band practices. I ended up buying an old Laney hc50b combo amp. It's fairly light and easy to haul and, even though it doesn't get the greatest sound, it's good enough and definitely loud enough for our rehearsals.
     
  7. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    It's an Americanism. It's more polite than saying
    "beat to s**t.
     
  8. Ty McNeely

    Ty McNeely

    Mar 27, 2000
    TX

    Just a piece of crap thats not worth much that can be left where ever you want so it doesn't have to be drug back and forth.
     
  9. Steven Green

    Steven Green

    Jul 25, 2001
    Pacific NW
    We play at full-volume at all times...which is why I'll be deaf and have tinitis at the age of 30...:(

    ...hopefully this will change!
     
  10. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    I use the same rig for rehearsals and gigs a single 4x10 cab with 200 watt head.

    the rest of the ensamble runs thru two 1x12 cabs thru a small mixing board.

    we rehearse and gig at pretty low sound levels, and now that i think about it, this is the only group ive ever been in where my ears dont ring at all after rehearsals or sundays sermons.
     
  11. mgood

    mgood

    Sep 29, 2001
    Levelland, Texas
    In the last band I was in, the guitar player had a beater Crate bass combo in the rehearsal room. I moved my Carvin stack in and brought his beater home with me for an at-home practice amp.

    One of these days, I'm going to have two identical stacks, one at wherever we practice and one at home. I'll only have to carry a small rack back and forth. If we do a gig big enough to justify a monster rig, I'll take both stacks and put them together as one, or set one up on either side of the drum riser. :)
     
  12. Thanks for all the replies. I will probably get a smaller amp and leave it where I practice, a cheap (beater?) amp. One day I will have a cab at home and at practice with just an amp to carry. But first I want a Fretless Jazz. Fretless I say.
     
  13. bizzaro

    bizzaro

    Aug 21, 2000
    Vermont
    Get some hearing protection. :(

    It may take some getting used to but use hearing protection. Those foamy things are better than nothing, but even better are Sonic II's. I have stuck cotton in my ears in a pinch. I have never been without them so I am used to it. I am sure if you haven't used them it will bug you not being able to hear as well at first. The Sonics are supposed to only block the higher, harmfull frequencies, but in reality everything sounds a little muffled. Get used to it and save your hearing. Most music stores carry them. Sorry if I am off topic here but I feel this is important. After all, music is "HEARING"!! ;)
     
  14. Steven Green

    Steven Green

    Jul 25, 2001
    Pacific NW
    well...now I feel really bad...




    I own a pair of HEAROS!:eek:
     

  15. read: slapper :D