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Removable Wood Endpin and transporting bass

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by Toy Sun, Sep 29, 2008.


  1. Toy Sun

    Toy Sun

    Nov 21, 2006
    Seattle, WA
    Discounted Gear: Eden Amps
    Hi,
    I'm all excited about getting/making a wooden endpin. I always have my pin at the exact same height (kinda obsessive about this) so this is perfect for me, but I have two questions:

    1. What happens when you pick up your bass? Does the pin fall out? That seems like a drag.

    2. When the bass is packed up, it's in it's bag, pin is in the pocket, and you are standing by your car to open the hatchback, etc... do you just put your endpin "receiver" (what is that piece called?) straight on the ground? I'm used to having my pin with it's rubber tip protecting my bass.

    Thanks in advance,

    John
     
  2. I don't use a fixed endpin, but I've done the same deal (just putting my bass on the socket) a lot, because often I'll take my wheel out to navigate buildings, masstrans etc. My socket is a very heavy, unfinished brass piece and it really hasn't been bothered. It gets rough around the bottom, I smooth it out when I have nothing better to do (i.e. rarely) and I don't worry about it...

    Maybe you could find a Jumbo rubber tip and just stuff it over the whole socket, then drill a hole in the bottom to allow your new pin through.

    You could just leave the old pin in there with the rubber tip (just cut off all the excess rod) and have your new pin installed like the Laborie jobs; just bore a hole. Should work just as well at a 90* angle as any other and you get the bigger dia. rod so it should theoretically sound even better...
     
  3. RCWilliams

    RCWilliams Commercial User

    Apr 23, 2007
    Merriam Kansas (Kansas City)
    owner RC Williams Co. LLC
    you have two choices 1) make a whole new end button and end pin both with the standard 17 to one taper (the hard way)
    2) cut the end off your existing end pin and turn a wooden pin bore the end and afix the pin in the end there by creating what I refer to as a hybred end pin. I think it is a good idea to use a furrell any time you glue a steel or carbon fiber pin into the wood to help the wood resist splitting due to lateral loads.

    the hybred aproach is the easy way, as the taper business can be dificult wityh out the right tools.
     
  4. Rvl

    Rvl

    Dec 23, 2003
    Aomori Japan
    What about this setup from KC Strings?

    Thanks

    Robert VanLane

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Rvl

    Rvl

    Dec 23, 2003
    Aomori Japan
    Or what about having a super short wooden endpin for traveling and a longer one for playing

    Like this one from KC but without the metal tip and a little shorter with a rubber tip only

    Maybe KC can offer a short/long set for a special price (hint hint wink wink , say no more , say no more)

    Thanks

    Robert VanLane

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Eric Hochberg

    Eric Hochberg

    Jul 7, 2004
    Chicago
    If you are still using or keeping the original socket, just put the old pin back in for travel.
     
  7. mheintz

    mheintz

    Nov 18, 2004
    Instead of lugging the old pin around, I use a crutch tip. Look for stores that sell medical or geriatric supplies. They'll usually have a selection of crutch and cane tips.
     
  8. Eric Hochberg

    Eric Hochberg

    Jul 7, 2004
    Chicago
    You have to put it on a pin, don't you?
     
  9. mheintz

    mheintz

    Nov 18, 2004
    No, you can fit a big tip over the collar, assuming that you haven't removed the collar entirely. I used to play without any pin at all and just kept the tip on the collar.
     
  10. Toy Sun

    Toy Sun

    Nov 21, 2006
    Seattle, WA
    Discounted Gear: Eden Amps
    Hi all,
    Thanks for the replies, I think the large crutch tip over the whole socket is going to be the way to go.

    What about the issue of the fixed endpin falling out when you pick up the bass?

    Thanks

    J
     
  11. Jake deVilliers

    Jake deVilliers Commercial User

    May 24, 2006
    Crescent Beach, BC
    Owner of The Bass Spa, String Repairman at Long & McQuade Vancouver
    The screw that holds your present pin will work on the new one. :)
     
  12. Eric Hochberg

    Eric Hochberg

    Jul 7, 2004
    Chicago
    That's fine, but if you need to use the socket for the wood pin, then you'd have to remove the crutch tip and take that on and off the bass. I would think removing an endpin would be easier than regularly changing the crutch tip, where pressure is involved in keeping it secure. Also, it's really not too difficult carrying an extra endpin in you bag, LOL. I carry two, a regular steel and a laborie. I use a 4" piece of drumstick with crutch tip when transporting the bass.
     
  13. mheintz

    mheintz

    Nov 18, 2004
    Carrying an extra pin is definitely not a big deal. On the other hand, I found a tip that isn't hard to remove. The tip can be slightly oversized. I found that when the zippers on my case are closed the tip stays fine. Unless you plan to keep it on all the time, it's better to get one that is a bit bigger. If necessary, you can simply wedge a piece of paper on an oversized tip to keep it snug and remove the paper to get the tip to release. Or you can just carry your old pin as ehochberg suggested. I often use an eggpin, so carrying around another pin was a minor inconvenience that I'd rather do without.
     
  14. Toy Sun

    Toy Sun

    Nov 21, 2006
    Seattle, WA
    Discounted Gear: Eden Amps
    Oh, is that the concept? You still use the endpin screw with one of the "bottoming out" endpins?

    See, my issue is the constantly stripping thumbscrew. Now with my French bass in the USA, I am out of the 5 metric thumbscrews I brought back with me from Europe, and I can't find metric thumbscrews.

    Before y'all tell me where to find them, know that the "bottom out" endpin idea appeals to me.

    thanks

    John
     
  15. Jake deVilliers

    Jake deVilliers Commercial User

    May 24, 2006
    Crescent Beach, BC
    Owner of The Bass Spa, String Repairman at Long & McQuade Vancouver
    The wood part rests against the bottom of your endpin socket while the pin goes into the hole to provide for a firm attachment. That's why they are available in different rod diameters. :)

    If you know what your thumbscrew thread pitch is, I could look around here in vancouver - we're officially metric too....
     
  16. Officially metric, but hardware stores still tend to stock imperial-threaded thumbscrews. Even Lee Valley if I recall correctly... but I just buy their 1/4" x 20 cast iron thumbscrews as this is the most common thread on basses around here.

    I'd suggest that any thumbscrew into a wooden endpin might rather quickly chew the shaft into splinters. The Laborie solution with a 23:1 taper (or whatever it is) seems to be quite secure, while remaining removable. If fitting a tapered pin to your existing endpin cone by reaming it out is not practical for reasons of dimensional limitations, perhaps a custom-made wooden cone is in order. Nic Boychuk's 'N-pin' is another possibility, as the quick-release and smooth collet would be friendly to wood.
     
  17. RCWilliams

    RCWilliams Commercial User

    Apr 23, 2007
    Merriam Kansas (Kansas City)
    owner RC Williams Co. LLC
    you might try an auto parts store for metric screws, once you switch to the hybred style pin, there will be much less pressure required to keep the pin from faling out.
     

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