1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Removing cigarette smoke from carpeted cab

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Funkmeister79, Nov 1, 2010.


  1. This may have been covered before - I've heard vinegar, baking soda, febreze, windex...but nothing specifically for a carpeted cab.

    Anyone out there with experience with getting it out of a carpeted cab???

    Gracias.
     
  2. L-A

    L-A

    Jul 17, 2008
    Eh?
    Febreeze will just hide it, I don't think this is what you're after.

    Baking soda doesn't sound bad - if cigarette smoke leaves something acid then it ought to help.

    I heard vodka helps too, but it has to be along with a "regular" washing method.
     
  3. Skitch it!

    Skitch it!

    Sep 6, 2010
    The pain in the rump with cigarette smoke is that it sticks and permeates because of the tar content, I'd see if you can hire a little steam cleaner (that are usually used for carpet cleaning and are low friction I believe) and melt/clean that crap out with very little residual water to concern about. Anything else is just masking it really, it's a sticky horrible tar deal.
     
  4. cheap vodka spritz and then a steam cleaning. alcohol dissolves the tar and the steam washes it away.
     
  5. Here is my tried and true recipe:
    Fresh air, time, Febreeze and sunshine.
    You will need to disassemble the cabinet as all components absorb that odor. If there is fiberglass or foam batting inside you will be better off removing it and replacing with fresh cuz you'll never completely get that smell out. Set the cab and assorted parts outdoors if possible for several days where you will get full sunlight, once the smell is lessened to half or better then febreeze and leave out a few more days. After a day cover the speaker cone(s) so the cement will not dry out from exposure to sunlight.
     
  6. nutdog

    nutdog when I'm a good dog they sometimes throw me a bone Supporting Member

    Feb 19, 2009
    in the dog house
    This. After about six vodka tonics I don't notice the smell at all. But Jack Daniels works best.

    Edit: I suppose I should add something constructive. I have let mine sit in the garage for a week or so, spraying with lysol and/or fabreeze daily. It eventually went away. Now I specifically avoid carpet/fur covering. All my gear is now plastic/line-x/tolex. I also avoid smoke.
     
  7. L-A

    L-A

    Jul 17, 2008
    Eh?
    While I always expect a plethora of half-digested memes, this is one of those situations where the world goes upside down and Thunderscreech is totally right.
     
  8. BassyBill

    BassyBill The smooth moderator... Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2005
    West Midlands UK
    Just start smoking and you won't notice the smell.
     
  9. VroomVroom

    VroomVroom Supporting Member

    Jan 2, 2007
    SF Bay Area, CA
    If the cab is truly a keeper, two options come to mind. First, an extractor...although you'll need to be careful with the temperature and amount of fluids (soap and water). Second is an ozone machine, which realistically is the most efficient way to do this.

    I say that to say this...

    Two types of businesses have one or both, and it's probably worthwhile to explore having the service performed, as opposed to buying equipment and gaining expertise yourself. First is high-end automotive detail shops. Second is fire/flood/crime scene cleanup specialists. Cash is often king with both of these types of vendors, and if you can catch them between jobs you may be pleasantly surprised at the cost. Good luck...
     
  10. Thanks to all for the suggestions. I don't think all the rigamarole is worth it for this one cab, and I'm going to try and return it to the seller. I'd rather wait and save up for a healthy cab.
     
  11. Carpet is one of those hard-to-clean-smells-out-of surfaces. My first car was owned by my grandfather, who was a smoker, and then was borrowed (before it was my vehicle) by a family friend who also smoked. To this day, it still smells slightly of cigarette smoke.

    Also, Sigged.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.