Removing Windshield Scratches

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by The Golden Boy, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. Has anyone had to remove scratches from their windshield? I had gone to a gas station on Sunday evening and I used the squeegee that was there. It looked brand new (how often do you see a brand new squeegee at a gas station?) and when I heard it making squeaking sounds on the glass I just thought that's the sound a brand new squeegee makes. I didn't drive my car Monday, but yesterday morning when I left the house I see thousands of scratches all over my windshield.

    Does anyone know a good way to remove all these scratches?
  2. There's supposedly a gel polymer you can get at auto stores that can fix that. It "resurfaces" the scratches...cannot vouch for what it does for visibility or optical quality, but there ya go bro.

  3. DigMe


    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    That's weird. I wonder if something abrasive somehow got stuck to the rubber...or if someone purposefully stuck something to it.

    By the way, the sound a new squeegee makes is "Squeeeegeeee"

    brad cook
  4. Is glass replacement free on your auto insurance? Time for a new windshield maybe...

    One thing about Mass: we get free glass, but the weather sucks ass.

    a little poem for ya. :smug:
  5. Ha! FenderBender! Ha! Your funniness has gotten the better of you! For I visited the local auto parts establishment and was suggested a NicSand Auto Glass Resurfacing kit that is a buffer pad that fits on the end of a drill... I haven't gotten the nads to use it yet... :rolleyes:

  6. Who would have thunk it!!! I remember using a buffer pad to polish plexigass in 9th grade shop class, but i wouldn't think that it would work on a windshield. They have to smooth them out some how :)
  7. Wow, that's cool... Still be careful, take off too much glass in one spot, you'll give your windshield astigmatism! ;)
  8. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    The Eastwood Company used to sell a kit for polishing windshields. It consisted of a thick polishing pad that mounts in a polisher or a hand drill, and a compound that you mix with water to make a slurry. With a couple hours of work one hot and humid summer day, it did a good job of taking out nearly all of the little sparklies in my windshield. But a couple weeks later on I-84 a small stone chipped the windshield, and I had to have the thing replaced anyway.