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Repairing a broken Bob Golihur bow

Discussion in 'Bows and Rosin [DB]' started by lownotes02, Dec 24, 2005.


  1. lownotes02

    lownotes02

    Jan 19, 2005
    Melbourne, Fl
    I bought one of Bob's french bows and loved it.
    Much to my dismay, I was practicing, set it up on my EB cab (about 5 ft high), went to pick it up again, and bumped it.....it took a nosedive, hit the floor, and broke in two, about six inches from the tip :(
    I'm hoping when I glue it back together that the sound won't be affected too much. Is epoxy okay, or are there better glues out there that won't color the sound?
     
  2. billybass

    billybass

    Oct 14, 2003
    New Orleans
  3. lownotes02

    lownotes02

    Jan 19, 2005
    Melbourne, Fl
    Thanks Billy.
    I'd planned on using JB Weld, since Ive had good luck repairing numerous wood/glass/metal items with it, but if the G2 is better for bows, I'll buy it instead.
    One question...in the description, it says that the joint will yawn or flex when repaired. Since the sound travels thru the stick, wouldn't it be better to have a solid connection instead of one that's flexible? Or is there some luthier secret that makes this a better glue?
     
  4. Jazzman

    Jazzman

    Nov 26, 2002
    Raleigh, NC
    In the future, keep all double basses & accessories away from anything to do with the bass guitar. :spit:
     
  5. lownotes02

    lownotes02

    Jan 19, 2005
    Melbourne, Fl
    Yeah, I've learned my lesson. :meh:
    I've put all my EB gear in another room as to not jinx my DB gear.
    The EB stack hasn't been used or plugged in for over a year. I thought it'd make a nice 1500 dollar bow holder.
     
  6. Blaine

    Blaine

    Aug 4, 2001
    new york area
    it was my impression that cyanoacrylate (super glue) is the preferred glue for this kind of repair.
     
  7. Ummmm.... no. period.
     
  8. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Why not ? You don't plan to un-glue it, do you ? My experience is that superglue(TM) works great in the skilled hands of my luthier friend who uses the most fluid variety for better capillary absorption of the stuff and therefore better binding. He stores and uses it in the cold so it does not dry too fast. The skilful aspect of the procedure is to figure out how the parts are going to be held together while the glue is drying. This works on "cleanly" broken bows and the repair is often difficult to detect without a very close inspection of the bow (now you're warned).
     
  9. from my experience, normal super glue does not hold up well under pressure. It also dries out and flakes off. There are different grades available, I've seen them in the stew- mac
    catalogue, and that may be what you're referring to.
    But considering the amount of pressure exerted on the bow, I would still be wary of using it.
     
  10. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    What would you suggested, then ?
     
  11. Duct tape :p (Just kidding, don't flame me :bag: )
    Seriously, though I would look at some of the aforementioned Epoxys for a solid bond.
     
  12. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    I had a crack in a bow professionally repaired by KC Strings with, yup, super glue. It was not broken all the way through, only cracked. It has remained absolutely solid and the repair is almost undetectable.

    If you use an epoxy that is fairly viscous, which most are, it will hard to get the bow aligned properly and the break will be very obvious. JB Weld is a great product, but it mixes very thick and dries a nasty grey color.

    If you are insistent on using epoxy, I would look into those two-parts that are commonly used for woodworking. I know there is one out there that is designed for use on things to be left outdoors that mixes fairly thin. Plus, it is brown, so it will be easier to make the repair less obvious.
     
  13. Blaine

    Blaine

    Aug 4, 2001
    new york area
    i was taught the super glue technique in a bow repair class. but having said that, i'm not a bow repairman.
    good luck whichever way you go. if i were deciding, i would get a long dowel at home depot the same diameter and try to replicate the break a few times and try each method. just a thought.
     
  14. Blaine

    Blaine

    Aug 4, 2001
    new york area
    now that i think of it, i remember the repair. it was pretty fascinating. the stick was fit together dry and wrapped with a somewhat sretchy tape, like electrical tape but not as sticky.this was wrapped many times around the break leaving one end of the break visible. then super glue was was applied to the break, a few drops, and it wicked all the way thru the break. i think it works better the longer the break is.
     
  15. This sounds like a good idea, I wish I would have thought of that a few years back when I was fixing a cheapo violin bow.
    Had a bad experience with the super glue then, and it sort of distorted my opinion. I'm no bow repairman either, and I guess to base my opinion on one bad experience is the wrong answer. :oops: