1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Repertoire

Discussion in 'Orchestral Technique [DB]' started by murph36251, Jan 22, 2012.


  1. I have played through all the Simandl stuff and some other stuff but I am having trouble finding more music to play that isn't too difficult. Can anyone recommend me some music or post a link to some music.
    Thanks
     
  2. chris1125

    chris1125

    May 14, 2007
    When you say all of the Simandl stuff what do you mean? Have you played through the first book, the second book and the thirty etudes? How much solo stuff have you done? What is "to hard"? Are you in thumb position yet?

    From your origonal post I guess I'll assume that you've played through those three simandl books but haven't done many orchestal excerpts and solo works. If this us the case:

    Start an easier solo like the marcello sonata, if this us to easy try the eccles sonata or dragonetti concerto.

    Also, start working excerpts, if you want something not overly challenging try a wagner overture (might wa t to avoid the flying dutchman, that ones tricky) or maybe a brahms symphony (once again, generally OK but the 2nd symphony is really challenging).

    More importantly, ask your teacher. Nobody is going to know your situation and what us best for you then a teacher or atleast someone who's heard you play before.

    Btw, sorry for the spelling, my phone likes to "correct" my spelling sometimes :/
     
  3. Tom Gale

    Tom Gale

    May 16, 2009
    If you have played through all the Simandl stuff, you are now ready to play in the 1940's. Unfortunately, it's 2012. You need to expand the ideas in the Simandl closed hand techniques (1,2,4) and start into the basics of the open hand techniques (1,2,3,4) and some new ideas on the use of the thumb.
    Tom Gale
    ASODB.com
     
  4. Tom Gale

    Tom Gale

    May 16, 2009
    Let me give an example: a basic 1 octave Bb chromatic scale starting on low Bb. All the books will give the fundamental fingering of 1,1,2,4 0,1,1,2,4,0,1,2,4. No problem - works most of the time EXCEPT at a very rapid tempo and esp. if it is slurred. Then, the 1,1 becomes a problem trying to avoid the smear. The first 1 can't move until the pitch is established and then must move to the next note on time, etc.
    Here's a solution you won't find in 1940;
    1,2,1,2,0,1,2,1,2,0,1,2,4. Safe and clear at ANY speed BECAUSE the 1 is already moving as you are playing the 2!!
    Try it a few times and see. Works in 2012!
    TG :bassist:
     
  5. Tom Gale

    Tom Gale

    May 16, 2009
    Here's a solution you won't find in 1940;
    1,2,1,2,0,1,2,1,2,0,1,2,4. Safe and clear at ANY speed BECAUSE the 1 is already moving as you are playing the 2!!
    Try it a few times and see. Works in 2012!

    Well??? Anybody try it yet???
    TG :bassist:[/QUOTE]
     
  6. Thanks for the advice everyone! Tom I gave your fingerings a try. They are a little awkward at first but it really helps when the tempos are burning.
     
  7. Tom Gale

    Tom Gale

    May 16, 2009
    I should add that I also use the 1,2,1,2. in melodic passages as well as rapid ones. It's good to use both the 1,2,1,2. and the 1,2,4 depending upon the musical demands. I thought this was so important that I introduced the 1,2,1,2. on page 14 of my Practical Studies for D.B. which is early but it works!
    Tom Gale
    ASODB.com :hyper:
     
  8. Tom Gale

    Tom Gale

    May 16, 2009
    Sorry - I meant 1,1,2,4* up there.
    TG :rollno:
     

Share This Page