1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Replace P pickup with a J pickup at a 45 degree angle?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by rubendlr, Apr 30, 2015.


  1. rubendlr

    rubendlr

    Mar 10, 2012
    Austin, TX, USA
    I was wondering if anyone has done this mod and if they had some advice?

    I want to do this on a cheap Squire short scale Jag bass. I figure if I mess it up, I can always get a new pickguard and put the P back and no one would be the wiser;). It seems like it would be a minimal route job if you go with the natural tilt of the P pickup.

    Thanks ahead for your help/advice,

    RubenDLR
     
  2. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    i guess if you got a bridge J pickup (which is longer) so you could angle it and still line the magnets up with the strings. the trick would be finding one that was RW/RP with the existing bridge pickup so the pair would sound right and hum-cancel together.
     
  3. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Arbutus, MD
    Could you just flip the pickup upside down? That would accomplish both requirements.
     
  4. rubendlr

    rubendlr

    Mar 10, 2012
    Austin, TX, USA
    I am going to use PUs with bar/rail pole pieces, so no need to worry about string to pole piece alignment.
    Has anyone done this? Is the sound of the neck pickup adversely affected somehow by tilting it? Does it emphasize the bass or the treble, or neither? The whole point of this is too get the Jazz pickup in there with the minimal amount of carving, but if it doesn't sound good, what's the point? So I'm looking for someone that has actually done it and whether they're happy with the sound or not?
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2015
  5. yodedude2

    yodedude2 Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2005
    san antonio, texas
    long ago and far away, I put an active emg jazz bass pickup into a fender bullet b-34. I used as much of the existing route as possible; it almost fit anyway so very little route enlargement was needed. after the install, the b-34 sounded just like a bass with an emg jazz pickup.
     
  6. Bob_Ross

    Bob_Ross Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 29, 2012
    I've seen several instruments with an angled J-type pickup in the neck position: A Pensa-Suhr, a Moon, and a Schecter (older mid-80s made-in-USA model) ...also the old Gibson Victory basses had a similar angled pickup arrangement, though it wasn't exactly a J-type pickup. They all sounded fine; without being able to compare them side-by-side with a "normal" Jazz Bass though there was nothing conspicuously different sounding about the angled pu.
     
  7. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    hmm, yeah i suppose you could, assuming F-style polepiece magnets; there would be some fiddling with the hookup leads to get them under the pickup cover of course.
     
  8. rubendlr

    rubendlr

    Mar 10, 2012
    Austin, TX, USA
    This was my thought exactly. Go for the full on Jazz sound/setup and only have to shave a teeny weeny bit of wood out. Cool. Thanks, yodedude2.
     
  9. yodedude2

    yodedude2 Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2005
    san antonio, texas
    let us know the results! i had that emg pickup in several different basses and they (it) always sounded the same. it was 'the great equalizer' of pickups.
     
  10. mormoyboy

    mormoyboy

    Oct 9, 2012
    NWOhio
    where did / do you get the rail jazz pickups?
    i have been looking for some!
     
  11. thomas-k

    thomas-k

    Nov 9, 2008
    Grasse, France
    There was this, the Sandberg Umbo :

    [​IMG]
     
  12. MarkoYYZ

    MarkoYYZ Commercial User

    Jan 31, 2012
    Toronto
    Hammersmith Music
    Ibanez did this back in 85, IIRC. This catalog shows theur 86 models:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. rubendlr

    rubendlr

    Mar 10, 2012
    Austin, TX, USA
  14. mormoyboy

    mormoyboy

    Oct 9, 2012
    NWOhio
  15. iiipopes

    iiipopes Supporting Member

    May 4, 2009
    Several models of EMG actives are rails.

    One caveat: the Jazz pickup will have more upper mid grind, of course. By mounting it at an angle, you will get even more tonal disparity between a twangy G string and a thumpy E string than even a P-pickup does. I would suggest mounting it at the reverse angle to take the edge off the G string and keep more definition in the E string.

    Second item: if you look very, very closely, the poles of the neck position J pickup rarely, if ever, line up exactly with the strings. More often, the pickup poles are too wide. I believe that when Fender developed the J-bass, that they used a Precision mule, with a wider nut, and when the nut was established at 1.5 inches instead of 1.75, that they did not go back and narrow the pole pieces of the neck pickup accordingly. The practical effect is that a rotated neck pickup might actually line up better under the strings, each string going through the middle of each pair of pole pieces better.
     
  16. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Assuming they are Alnico magnets, it takes about 10 seconds to reverse their polarity with a couple strong rare earth magnets.
     
    sissy kathy likes this.
  17. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Arbutus, MD
    Being the rank amateur that I am, I didn't know that. That's why I ask these questions; to learn.
     
  18. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Its pretty simple, I use a couple 3/8" thick by 3/4" wide N52 neodymium disk magnets. I simply stick them to the jaws of my bench vice so that the north pole of one magnet is facing the south pole of the other. Then you adjust the vice to where the coil will just slide between them. Then you align the pole pieces to where they are repelled by the magnets on the vice and run them back and forth through the magnets a few times. That will reverse the polarity, then its just a matter of reversing the leads when you solder the wires to the pot. It only takes about $10 worth of magnets.
     
    sissy kathy likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.