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replacing speakers in "inefficient cabinets"

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Gabu, Feb 2, 2001.


  1. Gabu

    Gabu

    Jan 2, 2001
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Hi all,

    I am wondering... after hearing over and over about the inefficiency of Carvin cabinets:

    If you use a Carvin (or whatever) box and just replace the speaker (with a better one hopefully), is that going to make it more efficient? Or when you mention efficiency, does that have to do with the box structure rather than the speaker itself?

     
  2. If you just replace a speaker the box won't be tuned for the new speaker. Carvin speakers are fairly effecient in their price range. Your EQ settings are very important to getting through the mix and hearing yourself on stage. Most bassguitar and PA speakers sacrafice very low notes for loudness and duribility. There are better speakers but expect to pay $300+ for a raw frame speaker and have to make modifications on your cabinet.
     
  3. MikeyD

    MikeyD

    Sep 9, 2000
    Given a *particular* type of cabinet, I believe efficiency is mostly determined by the driver itself. There are losses associated with the electromechanical motor (eddy currents, copper losses, etc.) that turn into heat, losses in the suspension (spider and surround) that turn into heat, and then radiation losses, which have to do with the ability of the cone surface to efficiently impart motion to the air molecules nearby. It can get very complicated.

    One could presumably buy more efficient drivers, but as bassdude correctly suggested, one would have to re-tune the cabinet for optimal performance. In bass applications, the drivers and cabinet (and room!) truly form a coupled system.

    Of course, there are many types of cabinet design - the closed box and vented box being only two examples. Horn-loaded cabinets tend to be much more efficient - primarily because horns help the drivers impart motion to the air more effectively.

    - Mike
     
  4. Gabu

    Gabu

    Jan 2, 2001
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    So then would it make sense to call Carvin? Tell them,

    "I would like to replace these speakers with better ones. Can you recommend to me speakers that you manufacture, that will be correctly tuned to this cab, and will work better?"

    Or will they be like... uh... ??? hehe

     
  5. MikeyD

    MikeyD

    Sep 9, 2000
    I don't think that would go over too well (like a fart in a spacesuit, I suppose). I believe Carvin uses a particular set of drivers. I suppose if you "bribed" them with $100k they might build a custom cabinet just the way you like, with any driver you choose! ;) I can't speak for Carvin, but I think either you'll find that they work for you as they are, or you look to other brands for the solution. In fairness to Carvin, I think they are good cabinets for the money. If they don't quite cut it for you, you have to look elsewhere (and typically dig deeper into your pocket). Replacing the drivers yourself is an option, but then (a) you have to know what you're doing and match them to the cabinets, and (b) you'll have paid for *both* the original drivers and the replacments. You'd be better off just spending more $ for the cabs you really want, IMO.

    - Mike