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reproducing REALLY low notes...

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Stewmc5222, Oct 14, 2001.


  1. I'm about to take delivery of my 8-string Conklin and was wondering what some of you multistringers use to keep everything clean once it dips below the low B. And as I'm on a player's budget these days, I'm more interested in the solutions which aren't in the cash galaxy BagEnd occupies. Thanks in advance,


    Stew
     
  2. Then I suggest you don't play below low B ;)

    Seriously, frequencies below low B (which is 31 Hz) are close to impossible to reproduce. Most 5 stringer are, however, happy with a system that rolls of quickly below 60 Hz (one octave above low B). So I doubt the usefulness of an amp that can put out a clean low F#. You'd need several thousands of watts.
     
  3. SuperDuck

    SuperDuck

    Sep 26, 2000
    Wisconsin
    This is a job for JT...

    You can always go for PA subwoofers, but, as Joris mentioned, the wattage you will need is going to be pretty hefty. Those things suck up watts like popcorn.
     
  4. VicDamone

    VicDamone

    Jun 25, 2000
    Seriously, frequencies below low B (which is 31 Hz) are close to impossible to reproduce. Most 5 stringer are, however, happy with a system that rolls of quickly below 60 Hz (one octave above low B). So I doubt the usefulness of an amp that can put out a clean low F#. You'd need several thousands of watts. [/B][/QUOTE]

    With respect to Joris' response, it is possible to reproduce these low frequencies with as little as 400 watts/8ohms . Not knowing what a "players budget" is, I'll just say IMO adding a sub system is expensive ($1000-2500). But more important is how this sub systems sound will affect the bands stage sound. Baring that, you'd probably love the tone and the fell.

    There was a poll here a few weeks ago, how low do you need to go? And I belive the majority said 40Hz. I wondered just how many of those who responded to that poll have played with a real sub for any length of time?
     
  5. leper

    leper

    Jun 21, 2001
    i think you need to go well below 40hz...thats about where my cab rolls off, and i find myself using the semi-para-graphic (thats a mouthful) eq on my amp to boost up those super low frequencies. I play a 4 string, so its not a matter of roots, but those real low frequences affect the feel of the amp incredibly, and just make the tone so much more "whoop ass".

    as for what you need to go that low, search for anything john turner ever said (and if its not on topic itll at least be amusing), and even better than that is a thread called something to the effect of "cabinet building 101"...more info in that thread (or link to in that thread) than you ever thought you wanted to know :)
     
  6. thanks, one and all so far! please keep the info coming!
     
  7. silvermaneZ

    silvermaneZ

    Oct 10, 2000
    Houston, TX
    Again, check out John Turner's profile and webpage. He uses two Yamaha Subs for his lows, which apparantly works well for him.

    But if you are looking for serious low stuff, you have to at least play through a Bag End ELF system. Yes, they are expensive, with the speaker cabs, processor, and dedicated power amp running you at least $1600. But the sound that you get is HUGE and CLEAN! Don't discount it just because of the price. I am saving my money for a system right now. At least check it out and play through one if you can.
     
  8. 31 Hz isn't hard to reproduce at all. There are many competent subwoofer drivers available to the general public that go much lower than 31 Hz. Every THX equipped theatre you attend has subs that go far below 31 Hz.

    You need power... lots of power. And multiple drivers. If you really want to go this low, you must use multiple drivers to make any real amount of noise. If you don't have enough cones to move, you won't connect those low notes to the air. 10" subs are OK, but the 15" go much lower and move a lot more air. With Rockford subs, it takes (2.7) 10" drivers to move the same air volume as a single 15".

    My RB5 drives two 1x15 Rockford subs bi-amped with 2x10 JBL E110 using a QSC MX-3000a amp. This is entirely adequate for both outdoor gigs and typical clubs.

    I can keep up with my guitar player and his 60 watt amp + JBL E120. :D
     
  9. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    You could probably reproduce those frequencies with one watt but the question is "how loud"???

    I'll bet most players don't even know that it's going to sound like with full subs. It adds a fullness to the tone and if it's loud enough some serious vibration but if you're already going through a PA system, it's only for the benefit of you and your bandmates.

    It's totally your call but unless you are regularly using really good PAs (with good subs) AND have a sound guy to deal with the rumble you'll be pushing off the stage, seems to me it's a lot of money and gear for very little return.
     
  10. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    hey there.

    the bag end elf m-1 is definitely the way to go for the best reproduction of the low F#, but you're right, it is expensive. the pa subs that i use, the yamaha sw118iv, are light, and do a good, believable job with the low F#, from a sound point of view - very sufficient for the clubs that i've played in, as well as the recording that i've done. on an RTA they won't be "flat to 18 Hz" like the bag end stuff is, but they do sound good. i drive them with a 330 watt into 8 ohm per side power amp (BGW Perf 3) and it does ok. for all the applications i've needed.
     
  11. VicDamone

    VicDamone

    Jun 25, 2000