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Ric ID?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Baofu, Oct 13, 2003.


  1. Baofu

    Baofu

    Mar 8, 2003
    WA/CA
    I wondering what's the model name of a ric I played for a few in a music store.

    It was jetglo, dot inlays, I remember it being a 4001, and something to do with a reissue. '73? It had a toaster neck pup, and under the bridge cover it had a funky looking pup, almost like a single coil for guitar, but big and you know, with 4 pole pieces.

    Does this sound familar to anyone? I may be joining the ric club.
     
  2. DW

    DW

    Jun 22, 2000
    Sounds like a 4001v63 to me.
     
  3. Scott D

    Scott D

    Apr 21, 2003
    Minneapolis, MN
    did it have body binding? (the white stuff going all around the body and neck)
     
  4. Baofu

    Baofu

    Mar 8, 2003
    WA/CA
    Yes, it did have binding, the owner also babbled something about the rickenbacker name on the headstock being under the clear name plate, as opposed to engraved on the top.
     
  5. Scott D

    Scott D

    Apr 21, 2003
    Minneapolis, MN
    hmmm, are you sure t'wasn't a vintage 4001? or did it look brand new?

    Its odd, theres this 4001 at my local shop, but it has like glittery triangle inlays... and i thought that 4001's only had dots...
     
  6. Baofu

    Baofu

    Mar 8, 2003
    WA/CA
    Yeah, it was new.
     
  7. Scott D

    Scott D

    Apr 21, 2003
    Minneapolis, MN
    the 4001V63 has no binding...
     
  8. DW

    DW

    Jun 22, 2000
    There is no brand new Rickenbacker with both dot inlays and binding and offered in Jetglo. Could have been a NOS 4001v63 but that has no binding. The 4001c64 is its successor but that has no binding and is not being offered in Jetglo. A 4003 only comes with triangle inlays and besides, you said it was a reissue.

    There are only 3 RIC bridge pickups: the high gain, with 4 button top screw poles (4003); the reissue horseshoe, with a split in the top surround and 4 alnico magnet poles (4001v63/4001c64); and the humbucker which is only in the 4004 and is definitely not a reissue or funky-looking.
     
  9. You are absolutely right!


    [​IMG]
    Treena
     
  10. Baofu

    Baofu

    Mar 8, 2003
    WA/CA
    The bridge pup was definitely the reissue horseshoe you described, DW.

    But no, it's wasn't "brand new", struck me as NOS when I saw it.

    Maybe it was mislabeled, but it did have dot inlays, white binding, jetglo finish, and the split mute/cover. The guy also said the fretboard was laquered rosewood, very light looking board.
     
  11. Sounds nice. Check the serial number on the jack plate to confirm it's actual birthdate.

    If you're really lucky it's an original 4001 that's been well looked after.

    Also, if you can, check the truss rods (remove the headstock plate for access) - if there is only 1 rod in there, it's an original 4001. 2 rods, and it's a recent/reissue model, or perhaps a custom.
     
  12. DW

    DW

    Jun 22, 2000
    No. The 4003s have the redesigned truss rods, but all 4001s do have 2 truss rods. And it can't be a custom because RIC doesn't offer customs.

    Baofu, RIC just does not offer any regular bass models with both dot inlays and binding, and AFAIK they never have except for the very limited Shadow model in the late '80s - and that did not have the horseshoe pickup.
     
  13. kutz

    kutz

    Mar 19, 2003
    Orange County CA
    4001's have dual truss rods. The 4003 has dual truss rods that are somehow stronger to allow for the use of roundwound strings.
     
  14. My original '61 4000 has dual truss rods.


    What does that have to do with round wound strings?


    [​IMG]
    Treena
     
  15. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    I think these are two unrelated issues. Hopefully someone who is more of a Rick expert will chime in and clarify, confirm, or deny. But my impression is:
    - the truss rods were changed between the 4001 and the 4003. They are in some way a different design which allows for easier adjustments.
    - - flats are generally at higher tension than rounds, so there is no need for a "stronger" trussrod..
    - sometime during the life of the 4001 or 4003 series, the frets were changed to a harder material, in order to allow use of roundwounds with less wear.
     
  16. Thank you for the insight and I agree there seem to be two issues being discussed, sorry if I went off topic. I just didn't see where dual truss rods had anything to do with identifying the bass in question!



    [​IMG]
    Treena
     
  17. kutz

    kutz

    Mar 19, 2003
    Orange County CA
    From what I understand, before roundwound strings were available, flatwounds were made differently and were of a lower tension that flats of today. When roundwounds came out, many 4001 necks were ruined by the extra tension, but many were ok. (I've got a '75 & a '76 4001, both with roundwounds and perfectly straight necks). The 4003 has redesigned rods to allow for higher tension strings (although none of this matters anymore since strings are made differently and flats of today have much higher tension than flats of the past) and easier rod adjustment. On the 4001, you have to bend the neck into the position you want it, then adjust the rod to keep the neck in place. On a 4003, you adjust the neck just like any other bass.
     
  18. DW

    DW

    Jun 22, 2000
    That's pretty close. The original 4001 necks were designed for Rickenbacker's own brand strings, which happened to be very low tension flatwounds, they were made for RIC by Maxima and had a very small core wire. You also need to remember that there was hardly anything available in aftermarket strings back then. The necks just weren't designed for some of the higher tension strings that became popular in the 70s, particularly Roto rounds. Yours are fine but many necks were damaged beyond repair. Some were just too thin. So the 4003 necks were made thicker.

    The truss rod issue is incidental to this, since they don't contribute to the neck stiffness. The old RIC rods were the folded rod design similar to the one in Cumpiano's book. Fine for short acoustic guitar necks but didn't work well to control longer necks. If you just crank the rods, they can cause the neck to move unpredictably -- they can pop the fretboard or cause other damage, so you need to adjust them as you described and everything will be fine. The 4003 rods are very similar to the TRS rods sold by Luthier's Mercantile, when you crank the rod, the neck will move in a predictable way.

    Hope this makes sense.
     
  19. Thank you for all the great info regarding truss rods for Rickenbacker. I've learned a great deal here today!

    [​IMG]
    Treena
     
  20. Wow, I opened up a can'o'worms...my bad, nevermind.

    I reckon 4003 trussrods suck...the endplate always seems to dig in on an angle, sometimes (if not careful) causing the neckplate to not sit flush. Anyways, my basses have been stable since setting the necks correctly so I no complain.

    By "custom" Rics, i'm meaning things such as the redneck, blackstar, etc...there were a few oddities that Rickenbacker made that don't show up.